The Impact Of The Industrial Revolution In India

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The Industrial Revolution in the 19th century was an immensely remarkable time period in the world’s history. The revolution brought advancement throughout the world that transformed countries from premodern to modern. Typically, students are taught about modernization by examining The West: Britain, United States, Germany, and France. This is a result of The West having enormous success during the Industrial Revolution, which leads a great deal of people to believe that the Industrial Revolution was an exceptional time for the world and brought success to all countries. After further investigation, however, the progress during the time period is actually better understood by researching modernization as a global process and analyzing the countries …show more content…
The first railroad was built in India in 1850 and only 65 years later, in 1915, India had over forty thousand miles of track. The railroads being built in India were under British command because India was Britain’s colony. The British were attempting to have the roads built at American speed which was beyond the resources of Indian finance. G.V. Joshi, one of India’s leading economic writers, explained in an article, “We are not opposed to the growth of the Railroads per se. They are good in their own way as providing cheap transit and promoting national solidarity, and facilitating trade-movements, but when their extension is made the ultimate goal of State action… in a country like India, a healthy material advance on normal lines must be duly taken into account.” Although the railroads were a concern to many Indians, and did impoverish the country, they were the start of modernization in India. After railroads had been built, exports and manufacturing grew and India built 323 banks. Although India was adopting new technology, it was difficult for the country to rise above poverty because almost everything in India was controlled by Britain and most of the money made went to Britain as …show more content…
Even Japan, who had previously attempted to stay isolated from the world, began modernizing in the 1870s. “Missions” were sent out of Japan to study areas where The West was more advanced, such as “shipyards and factories, colleges and high schools, military academics and railroads terminals, statehouses and churches” in the United States and Europe. After understanding how all these new aspects worked, Japan began building their first public school system in 1872 and by 1900, 90% of children went to school. Japan began industrializing their country quickly, with silk cloth factories being the leading Meiji industry. Like silk cloth, coal mining also expanded rapidly which greatly fueled the growth of modern industry and became a major source of export capital. After only twenty years of modernizing, by 1892, Japan had built railroad lines, increased exports, built steam-powered factories, and the industrial transformation had become

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