The Cons Of Racial Profiling

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Racial Profiling Racial profiling: the practice of assuming that one has committed an offense on the sole basis of their race or ethnicity. More often than not, racial profiling also goes hand in hand with police brutality and corruption. While repudiation of the argument that liberal media outlets make the effort to observe police-minority interactions through untainted lenses by hyperbolic perspectives difficult, the recent abundance of questionably handled cases within the United States involving people of minority groups and police officers has nonetheless incited national debates over what changes need to occur in order to have a more efficient policing system. The American justice system must take the initiative to put an end …show more content…
Their mindset often centers on isolationist and slightly cynical values due to their love-hate relationship with the general public. In a subcategory of cynicism, the factor of racism plays a large role. Officers that have had unpleasant experiences with certain ethnicities or races will start to link groups of people to negative stereotypes such as proneness to crime. This mentality leads to racial profiling, allowing for it to become a simple but inappropriate shortcut for evaluating everything from commonplace interactions to grave situations that require pensive thought. Indeed, nothing completely objective ever exists about any new media corporation, with liberal media machines bearing no exception in their sometimes stark use of embellishment and “race card” playing with regards to how they interpret police-minority interactions and disseminate them. Completely isolated from this fact, however, goes the alarmingly racist open statement made by former President GWB shortly after the September 11 attacks, leading to augmented violent aggressions against minority races under the guise of anti terrorism measures …show more content…
Not only do African Americans have a higher chance of incarceration, but they also have a higher chance of losing their lives during police confrontations. For example, the major city of Austin, Texas sees primarily African Americans and Latinos comprise the ethnically unbalanced statistics of citizen casualties by the Austin Police Department, even though more than half of the suspects posed no threat to the officers (Cokley). In his Fox News analytical opinion piece, John R. Lott pointed out a major statistical fallacy involved in the generation of ProPublica’s conclusion that “young black males… [are] at a twenty-one times greater risk of being shot dead by the police” than whites (Muskal); the actual description after remediation of the mistake boils down to only more than twice as likely (Lott). This post-adjustment value, while much diminished, still reflects an inflated degree of police bias towards citizens of color by that factor comparatively. The most obvious lethal weapon that officers have is their gun, but physical violence plays a large role as well. The death of Eric Garner, an African American, sparked national outrage after an onlooker recorded the incident and posted it to the internet. The video shows an officer holding Garner in an illegal chokehold while Garner repeatedly stated that he was unable to breathe.

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