Conflict Theory Of Police Officers

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However, there are many more factors that contribute to an accidental or intentional use of excessive and sometimes deadly force. One of them is lack of proper training and adequate control in police departments (Lee & Vaughn, 2010, p.193). For instance, some police departments failed to provide their officers with training where they would acquire communication skills regarding mentally ill or emotionally unstable individuals (p.201). Lastly, Bernasconi (2014, p.146) suggested that the media also play a large role in the exaggeration of facts and overrepresentation of certain individuals that can induce police officers’ emotions of fear and leads them to commit thoughtless split-second decisions. All things considered, there are many social, …show more content…
Moreover, this perspective is concentrated around social conflicts between groups of people where the rules are determined and reinforced by those who are more powerful. Thus, the conflict theory provides an explanation of why police officers in different parts of the world use violence or excessive force towards regular citizens. It advocates that stereotypes, misrepresentation of minorities by the media, and lack of intergroup communication could contribute to the set of values implanted in the law enforcement agencies which is totally different from the values of minorities or people living in disadvantaged areas. Therefore, because the minorities and residents of poor areas have different interests that do not correspond with the interests that police officers usually adhere to, it creates conflicts between these groups. For instance, many cases reveal that a lot of individuals killed by police officers were unreasonably seen as a threat, while, in fact, they did not even carry an object or behave in a way that could harm anyone around. It also occurs that police act differently with individuals of different race and ethnicity who are usually stereotyped of being dangerous and aggressive. Accordingly, the conflict perspective best explains the motive of the …show more content…
In the first place, it discussed two absolutely opposite researches on whether the police tend to target special ethnic groups such as African Americans. One research conducted by Brunson and Miller (2006) put forward the hypothesis that the minorities are more subjected to police violence, while Reiss’ studies (1968; 1971; 1980) argued that white men happen to be victims of police aggression more often than individuals of other races. However, the latter added that the victims tend to be from low socio-economic class. Thus, it supports the idea that unjustified excessive force is very often directed toward a certain group of people such as racial minorities or poor males. Moreover, other articles provided more broad explanation of the factors that induce law enforcement officers use this force. Social environment of some disadvantaged areas, failure to understand the minorities, stereotypes, exaggeration by the media and inadequate training were introduced as the main predictors of police violence. Lastly, Chaney and Robertson (2013, p.499) examined comments written by different people on the NPMSRP site. The results showed that most of them accused the police departments of promoting and constantly exercising violence against harmless citizens. In other words, the society does not support these acts of violence and demands changes. Therefore, the article written by Miller (2015, p.107)

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