Gospel Of Mark Immature Analysis

Superior Essays
The most effective methodologies to interpret the Bible To understand the Bible from a scholarly perspective is to be skeptical and make good judgments based on the evidences that are given. An academic scholar of the Bible must be able to apply various research techniques, use analytic skills, and have high theological knowledge to correctly interpret the Bible. In doing so, this allows the scholar to appropriately criticize and determine the significance and implications of many of the ancient texts. People of modern societies are then able to take the meanings of these texts, and attempt to relate this information about God into their own lives. Likewise, there are many methods that scholars have used to interpret the Bible. Textual criticism, …show more content…
This provides us a structured text which now can be read by individuals in an attempt to gain its literal meaning. Likewise, narrative criticism involves reading the bible texts and responding to them as hoped by the original writer. The reader must pay special attention to the various themes, characters and plot of the narratives to respond in this manner (Carr & Conway 275). This type of criticism also allows the reader to judge the stories as a whole and relate it to their own experiences. Specifically, the stories of Jesus in the Gospel of Mark give readers many opportunities to respond in the way that the author wants it. For instance, the first eight chapters draw readers to the compelling miracles conducted by Jesus. Jesus showcases his divine power by healing lepers, conducting exorcisms and eating with sinners (Mark 1-2). His rise in popularity is contrasted with the growing tension between Jesus and authorities, as seen with the accusation of the blasphemy from the scribes (Mark 2:6-7). Lastly, the conclusion of the Gospel Mark concentrates on the final days of Jesus before his death. The use of various literary devices such as plot, characters and setting produce many emotions that the author attempts to construct. The author wants the reader in a position to be in awe of the miracle stories and to question the intelligence of the disciples as they are often confused. Identically, the story of Abraham (Genesis 22:1-10) is another passage which proves this point; this narrative grasps the interest of the reader, by bringing up important questions in their minds. The author allows the audience to establish a meaning that is significant to their own life experiences. As a result, narrative criticism allows the reader to analyze the stories as a whole and develop an understanding of each narrative that will reflect their own personal

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