Sartre Absolute Freedom Analysis

Good Essays
Sartre's "Absolute Freedom " is exceptionally insightful and empowering. He provides his views on why he believes that free will exists. Sartre goes on to explain that just because we are free doesn’t mean we get away with doing anything. In fact, he claims that we are responsible for every choice we make. Because of this Sartre claimed that we are “Condemned to be free.” Sartre's views may be viewed as liberating and logical, but our knowledge of the world firmly supports that we may not be as free as he artistically expressed. Sartre believed that all men are free. He held that we do not make our choices because of a deity’s commands. Sartre believes in no god. Additionally, Sartre maintained that we do not make our decisions because of our nature or our nurture (two of the main deterministic arguments). He believed that choices are entirely our responsibility. Suicide and not choosing are choices as well. Furthermore, Sartre thought that, because there is no god to use humans as specific tools with a purpose, we are forced to be free to make our own. Humans create meaning for themselves through their actions. Although there are a lot of influences on those …show more content…
The consequences of our actions can be drastic and would most likely change the way we view ourselves. In living a life with Sartre’s philosophy would mature a person quickly. However, taking full responsibility for the consequences of your actions may not be entirely the correct to do. There are so many influences on the result of an action that it would be ridiculous to assume responsibility for a consequence, good or bad. A counter argument may be “Well, what if a person takes responsibility for only their part in the consequence?” That would be a better way to go about doing things; however, in most circumstances, it is nearly impossible to tell how much influence a person has had. Having Sartre’s perspective isn’t all that healthy either (Kunst

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    People believe that they are a free agent because they fail to understand the true motive that causes one to perform an action. Free agency is defined as the absence of obstacles that influences one’s desires and motives and that a free agent can perform an action he has proposed to these objects. Holbach’s response states that it is out of one’s control to remove obstacles and to be in an environment that cannot influence your desires. This means that free agency cannot exist because it is impossible for a person to have control over their environment and the objects around them. Therefore, the objects will continue to control one’s will and desire.…

    • 1285 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The reconciliation of moral responsibility and freewill allows us to understand how having freewill forces humans to believe that their behaviors and doings are morally responsible because their actions are caused naturally and or are determined. The question here is what is free will? Historically speaking, it is the action of acting freely; meaning everything is done causally due to the person. Free will and moral responsibility go hand in hand, but the issue is can a person really be in control of these things they had no control over? The problem with free will is that we believe determinism is true, but also that we are morally responsible; meaning we are held responsible for the actions we choose.…

    • 1628 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The grounds with for that idea is based around the idea that there is no creator or a God, this is where someone first has to really partially agree with before his other points start taking shape. I believe even someone that does not like the idea of there being no God, they can still agree with the notions proposed by Sartre. One way to do this would the idea of free will, the reason for this would be that if our essence of what a human is came before our existence, I believe the argument can be made that we can change we were already defined as with the tool of free will. Because of our free will, his ideas of our choices defining us humans can still be applied and reasoned with. The only place that it really runs into an issue would be the topic of a God planned destiny for us, then we get into the debacle of if this is true do we really have free will.…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In contrast, Sam Harris objected about the real concept of freewill. Harris is a neuroscientist and he believes that there is no such thing as freedom. According to him our brain acts upon our sub-conscious activities and human are just a puppet to their brain. As much as it sounds disturbing, it is a fact to some degree. In the book “free will” he explained that our…

    • 840 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Freedom Vs Determinism

    • 855 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I lean towards the freedom part but I will try to stay as neutral as possible. Determinism is belief that all events even human actions are predetermined. Many philosophers say that this implies that we as individuals have no free will. Also that we can’t be held responsible for the things we do. Ultimately everything that we do in our lives is already in place.…

    • 855 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    (SEP, pg.1) He believes it is all free will, but can't explain how. It is indeed true that humans often feel that "when making a choice we often sense we have genuine options and that we have the power to choose. We get the sensation that our decisions are ultimately up to us" (Vaughn, pg.337) The fact of the matter is that this experiential sense is illusionary. (Vaughn, pg.337) Our actions are not free and cannot be proven…

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In d’Holbach’s concept of free will, all is condensed to the physical brain and subject only to external influences rather than a soul, and consciousness. Therefore, it is unacceptable for a Dualist perspective to accept his stance on free will. Since d’Holbach views that there is no such thing as free will, a major concern of his argument is brought up being that if a persons’ actions are pre-determined and in order to fit with his proposition, it would not be morally correct to punish that individual for their actions. It would still be practical to isolate a harmful individual from society from d’Holbach’s view, except it would only be done for logical reasons and not for disciplinary…

    • 1345 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Determinism And Free Will

    • 794 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It is obvious that determinism and free will forms a contradictive relationship. If our action is causally determined, it is impossible for us to choose between options. However, compatibilist believes that there are no contradictions between determinism and free will at the same time claims that causal experience allows a person to act in a certain way which give rise to moral responsibility (Pereboom, 2014). Other than that, Richard Taylor (2002) summarize different versions of compatiblism as (1) the deterministic concept that human behaviour is causally determined; (2) that there is freedom in voluntary behaviour, so long as there is no physical impediment or constraint upon the action; and (3) that the cause of the voluntary behaviour (which is possible in the absence of impediments or constraints) is an internal state of the agent of the action (Taylor, 2002) The remaining parts of the paper will focus on the challenges that a compatibilist face based on the above…

    • 794 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Free will is a huge part of existentialism just based on the definition alone we know that people require free will in order to determine who we would like to be. In terms of Sartre, “[M]an is nothing else but what he makes of himself”; we are “condemned to be free.” (Cowan and Spiegel, 2009). Sartre believes that life is absurd and we crave our own sense of purposefully meaning to life. Without higher power to provide order we are given the perfect opportunity and provided with the ability to create our own meaning. We are defined by how we act, not by how society expects us to act.…

    • 2011 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Freedom from our background, and from the influences of the set of conditions imposed on us by the merits and demerits of our alternatives, is said to be a request to act arbitrarily, and this is no freedom. Compatibilist believes that much of the confusion about the conflict of determinism and free will stems not only from the confusion about freedom, but about determinism itself. Determinism, compatibilists insist, is not the frightful thing we think it is. People believe determinism is a threat to freedom because they commonly confuse determinism with a host of other things that are a threat to freedom. The concept of determinism is also widely misunderstood to be fatalism and vice versa.…

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays