Peacekeeping Doctrine

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REFLECTION ONE
Doctrine
Doctrine is the set of beliefs, instructions, or principles of a particular group or system. It is these principles which mark the difference between the “us” and the “them” of any group or system.
Example are found in all spectrums of life, for example, American politics–after 9/11, the United States’ “with us or against us” policy which is considered one of the four distinct areas of Bush Doctrine. The United Nations has its Peacekeeping Doctrine, known as “Capstone” which is outlined in chapter three of its extensive instructions. ,
Finally, Christian doctrine is the study of the revelation of God’s word where we are instructed, believe and recognize these things stated in the Nicene Creed–in short, there
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We “seek to understand the God revealed in the Bible and to provide a Christian understanding of reality”
The term “theology” is broad. There is a myriad of descriptive terminology which the theology students are or will become extremely familiar such as practical, biblical and systematic theology. We will also engage the genres of black, feminist and nearly any other prefaced hermeneutics which further expand upon our theologies.
In these prefaces, we are studying God within a framework of the world we live in. And yet, the science of theology is systematic, using the entire Bible as is its primary source. It is systematic and it is culturally relevant, “treating timeless issues” though modern culture and concepts.” Theology itself is the science of God and therefore the science of our Christian faith. The aim science is to engage in the intellectual study of a subject, in the case of theology, God. The key to proper intellectual study is that we study the One and Only God through the lens of our own faith. Without that lens of Truth, we are not studying God. Christian study requires our commitment to God first and foremost and through this, the student should be open to discussion but steadfast in our commitment to our beliefs and our
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Therefore the object of theology is the rational, intelligible, explanative, interpretation of Christian faith which is based on the primary text, The Holy Bible. The object of theology is God, as (theology) seeks to put the revelation of His Word into a modern and cultural context.
Theological Method
Theological method is a set of scientific parameters which are appropriate to the theology studied or performed. The method allows us to reach an objective, research, method, investigation and is a way to carry out the research and treatment of doctrine. It is the way to do theology. Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience allow us to interpret God and his absolute, inerrant Word. Unlike a secular or mainstream academic scientific method, theological method is fluid and conditioned by culture, history, and tradition. It is interruptive. Theological method is important to any Christian who desires to know more of God and his creation in a reasoned

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