Reasons For The 1920's Roaring

Decent Essays
1920 Roaring
I. When you think of the word roaring you think of the 1920s. The roaring twenties was the period right after WW1.The people of this time were hoping for a new change to come ahead and bring a period of happiness instead of the gloomy period once before. The 1920 was truly roaring because of the women activists, arts and culture, and inventions.

II. The first reason to prove that 1920 was roaring is the women activists. Women became more involved in visual arts as more than a hobby, new lifestyles were promoted, women were given a chance to play a role in political issues and women began to have some say in the direction of their lives.
Agnes Macphail was an inspirational women to all women who into politics. Agnes was the only
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Agnes Macphail was a supporter of women rights and wanted equality concerning divorce, old age pensions, and prison reform. Emily murphy was a writer, journalist magistrate, reformer, and reformer, and famous crusader for women rights and was the first women judge in the British Empire. Women also were working and earning money in the workforce they took on the role of a man which was huge. Women had a great impact on 1920 and contributed to the reason why it was roaring.

2. The second reason to prove that the 1920 is roaring because of the arts and culture. Popular culture in the 1920s was characterized by innovation in film, visual art and architecture, radio, music, dance, fashion, literature, and intellectual movements.
During the "Jazz Age," jazz and jazz-influenced dance music became widely popular. Jazz music and the dance clubs that played it became widely popular in the 1920s.Charleston was a very popular dance that was devolved by the African Americans. Jazz music and dance scandalized older generation which only encouraged its growth in the 1920.Jazz music also contributed to the flapper fashion as it allowed women to dance freely. Flapper a fashionable young woman intent on enjoying herself and flouting conventional standards of
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Pickford is a successful actress and producer .She started acting at a young age and then reached Broadway. She demanded higher salary so she would be able to get paid as much as men actors. She inspired future generations of women and filmmakers. She said “the past cant not be changed. The future is yet in your power”. She appeared in 51 films in 1909 almost one a week.

Another women great women is Emily Carr. Carr is a famous painter and writer. She was a well know artist in north America and Europe.one of her really known painting was Indian church which is located in arts gallery of Ontario. Carr said “Life 's an awfully lonesome affair. You come into the world alone and you go out of the world alone yet it seems to me you are more alone while living than even going and coming. “She was an independent women and great artists.

Overall the arts and culture had a great effect on the 1920. Jazz music and dance was really popular in clubs and flapper used this music to dance freely. Mary Pickford was a famous actress and producer and made it to Broadway and was the most paid actress in the 1920s.Emily Carr was a famous painter and traveled to North America and Europe. Carr has a painting named Indian church was is really well-known drawing. Arts and culture was truly recognized in

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