Reasons For The Electoral College

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The Electoral College is a group of people that represent the states of the US. This group of people are the ones who cast votes for the election of the president and also the vice president. The Electoral College has a total of 538 electors. 270 electoral votes are required to elect a new President. ” The Constitution assigns each state a number of electors equal to the combined total of the state’s Senate and House of Representatives delegations; at present, the number of electors per state ranges from three to 54, for a total of 538” ( Electoral College, n.d.). College of electors was created in 1787 by the framers of the Constitution. New electors’ are chosen for each election. The founding fathers had many reasons as to why they created …show more content…
Because of these reasons and many more the founding fathers went on a mission to figure out the best way to elect a new president thus Electoral College was created. The Constitutional Convention considered and thought of a variety of possible methods to aid in the election of a new president before going with Electoral College. The first method was to allow the congress to elect the president. However this idea was rejected because many believed that it would cause major issues and even create some bad feelings within the congress. “Others felt that such a procedure would invite unseemly political bargaining, corruption, and perhaps even interference from foreign powers. Some also felt that such an arrangement would upset the balance of power between the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. “ (The Electoral College, n.d.). The second idea to elect a president was to give the State legislatures the power to pick the new president. This idea, however, was soon turned down also. The third method that was thought of was to elect the president through direct popular vote. This too was also rejected because the founding fathers believed …show more content…
It is very possible for a person to win the popular vote but still loses the presidential election. “This is because although Americans vote directly for their chosen candidate, the president is elected by the Electoral College.” (Electoral Vote vs. Popular Vote, n.d). For example in the 2012 presidential election, Romney won the popular vote by 48% but he only won the electoral vote by 38%. Another example of this is the 2000 election. The 2000 election will always be ranked in the American history. To find similar cases such as the 2000 election scholars had to go all the way back to only find three other elections. Those elections were the 1888, 1876, and 1824 presidential elections. Out of all of the elections these were the only elections in American history that the person who won the popular vote did not become president because of the Electoral College system. Before the 2000 election, many Americans were unaware or did not have enough knowledge to know that the popular vote does not actually pick who will be the new president. However it is very clear now that presidents are chosen by the Electoral College. Americans now know that it is possible for a person to win the popular vote but lose due to the Electoral College. Many people around the world has complained about this method since 2000. People have started to believe that their vote does not count because a person can win the popular vote but still doesn

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