Essay On Immigration Between 1880 And 1925

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Immigration has always been a controversial issue in the United States, and even today it is still debated over by politicians. The country itself was built up from immigrants. For a small period of time from the 1880s until 1925, American had a relatively supportive and encouraging relationship with foreign immigrants because the United States was experiencing a major economic boom and the more workers available, the more prosperous the country became. However, these happy relations did not last because due to significant events like the First World War and the Red Scare caused many Americans to take on an adverse view of immigrants. From the time period 1880-1925, racism and tension steadily grew towards immigrants and the United States government made radical changes to regulate immigration.
During the early stages of the Gilded Age, the country was in dire need of a more expendable labor force to keep pace with the demands of factories and large corporations. People constantly looked for better ways to expand their wealth and if business owners had to pay their workers less, the more profitable the relationship. Therefore, the vast majority of Americans had a positive view of immigrants and welcomed their existence into the country with open arms (Document A). In the 1880s, there were very few laws that
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At the beginning of the time period, the American population generally had a positive outlook on immigrants because they helped boost the economy. As time began to progress, more and more hatred began to grow because immigrants began taking jobs from citizens and therefore, Americans started to want a quota rule. Following the First World War, the effects of the war and America’s involvement in foreign affairs led Americans to retain their status of isolation once

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