American Immigration In The 1920s

Improved Essays
1920s Homework
One of the major events that impacted the American view on immigration was the Red Scare. The Red Scare happened between 1919 to 1920 and was a repercussion to the achievements recently made by the United States in Europe. It was a fear of communism that swept the entire nation. This fear was instilled into the minds of American citizens that it caused suspicions all around the country for radicals promoting the spread of communism from the Russian government, now The Soviet Union. An event that came as a result of the hysteria was the Seattle General Strike. In this event, almost 100,000 workers in Seattle went on strike in favor of shipyard workers (Hartman). More specifically, during The Great War, there was a need for the
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Harding served from 1921 to 1923 and began his Republican Presidency in a depression. Although many advancements and growth in the economy boosted in the years of his incumbency the depression was not severe enough to completely crush the entire development achieved. The industrialization period that the United States went through during Harding years spurred President Harding to make policies accordingly. For example, motor vehicle registrations rose dramatically, approximately 9.2 million registrations were made in 1920(Burg). This created many sales for the vehicles themselves and growth in GDP and growth in the economy itself. These major increases in U.S. economic expansion, business people tried motivating Harding to create an budget director to advise the president on the budget and how to manage trade. However, President Harding signed the new legislation the Fordney-McCumber Tariff Act which cancelled lowered tariffs from the previous Underwood Act of 1913. This gave the president the power to increase or decrease tariffs up to 50%(Burg). President Harding’s time in office was short and achieved small things which to the next presidency that had a major impact on the United …show more content…
He shared many of the views of Harding and so many of the policies previously made were untouched. Specifically, President Harding’s act regarding tariffs. This decreased the amount of international trade American farmers had with other countries and it did not make the problems of the farmers any better. Although much of the issues concerning the farmers, during Coolidge’s incumbency the corporate net income in America rose from $8.3 billion in 1923 and increased to an even greater $10.6 billion in 1928(Burg). This showed that much of America enjoyed the prosperity President Coolidge was a part of creating except those of the farmers. Many of Harding’s policies were kept and reinforced with renewed acts and laws. For instance, the strict immigration quota Harding created that limited the amount of immigrants who came into America. Coolidge lowered the amount of immigrants who could enter the country from 700,000 per year to 300,000 per year in the Immigration Act of 1924(Burg). It showed how closely the morals and values of Harding and Coolidge were in the years they were both in

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