The Gilded Age By T. Jackson Lears And The Rise Of Industrial America

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Recently we were given two articles “The Gilded Age” by T. Jackson Lears and “The Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1900” by Richard White along with the video from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to read and watch. All of these resources allowed me to get a better understanding of the things going on during the Industrialization or “The Gilded Age”. For instance both articles collectively highlighted westward expansion, cultural and social shifts, the government's failure to recognize African-Americans as the white Americans equal equals , immigrants and economical changes. While these articles share a lot in common with one another they both share very few commonalities besides the involvement of the struggles African-Americans …show more content…
Jackson Lears claims the Gilded Ages produced many transformations in all corners of American society. For example Lear's points how the Gilded Age brought forth a shift from attempting to recognize African-Americans as citizens to a time in which racism was supported by our national government based off the implementation of the Jim Crow laws which segregated blacks from whites. The Gilded era also brought along the emergence of the working class who fought to keep their positions and for better conditions. Lear also touches upon the Gilded Age society which put emphasis on manhood led to an increase in men participating in activities such as “bodybuilding and vigorous outdoor sport.” while the women gave up more passive roles and took on jobs in an effort to become more independent. This shift in consciousness was prevalent amongst the upper and middle classes rather than the lower working class. One of the last items Lear's touches upon in his article is “Anglo-Saxon racism” which was basically the hatred towards anyone who wasn’t white Anglo-Saxon. This idea affected African-Americans along with Asians and even White …show more content…
When it came to westward expansion White explained how Americans need to further expand their nation led to the demise of Native Americans. Even so, some positives came out of westward expansion in the form of agricultural gain. The prospects of wealth caused Americans to pour out west where they discovered fertile land to produce successful crops. On top of that new forms of transportation began to develop and one the most popular was the railroads. The concept and execution of developing these railroads was successful and provided more jobs for those in need. The Industrialization of American helped to produce a growth within the economy which essentially surpassed the economies of other nations at this time. Alto During this industrial age there was a huge influx of immigrants primarily coming from southern and eastern Europe. Many white Americans had also developed a strong sense of nationalism which contributed to their hatred of immigrants who they believed were a threat to their livelihood. When it came down to beliefs and morals many Americans still maintained the idea that “individual enterprise, hard work, and free competition in open markets.” would make them successful and prioritized individualism.

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