Effects Of Immigration From 1840 To 1929

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During the period 1840 to 1929, the United States’ population was on a significant rise due to a major increase in immigrants. An increased combination of “pushes” and “pulls” improved migrations throughout the United States. Some push factors included poverty of farmers, overcrowding in cities, and religious persecution. Positive reasons for moving to the United States, or pull factors, included political and religious freedom, economic opportunities, and the abundance of industrial jobs in U.S. cities. There were many different reactions that came about from the increased migration of immigrants. While some were positive views, most of them were negative. In spite of the fact that amid the time of 1840 to 1929 nativist reaction toward immigration …show more content…
The anti-German hysteria of the war years turned quickly into anti-Communist hysteria known as the Red Scare. These anti-radical fears also fueled xenophobia that resulted in restrictions on immigration in the 1920’s. When the United States entered the war in 1917, some German Americans were looked upon with suspicion and attacked regarding their loyalty. Some immigrants were convicted and imprisoned on charges of sedition, for refusing to swear allegiance to the United States war effort. They can be convicted and imprisoned due to the passing of the Sedition and Espionage Acts. This was to prevent the support of U.S enemies during wartime. Also during the World War 1 era, the United States experienced a “Red Scare”. It was a national hysteria about the dangers of communists and radicals. In (Document 8), the 1919 cartoon features a “European Anarchist” sneaking up and attempting to set a bomb on the Statue of Liberty. An anarchist was the term for people who wanted to overthrow the government at that …show more content…
The image gives the impression that tons of Europeans want to move to the United States, but permitting all of them would overpower or overwhelm Americans. The caption, “The only way to handle it,” outlines the new law limiting immigration as the only coherent answer for the issue of overpopulation by Europeans. Before all the negativity and change of views toward immigrants during the late 19th century and early 20th century, nativists and the government did tolerate immigration during westward expansion. This is evident in the Homestead Act of 1862 where the government distributed the available public lands to private individuals. Congress also saw the Homestead Act as a way to build an agricultural nation by encouraging immigrants to settle there. Nativists tolerated them at this time because they were helping the United States’ economy as a

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