Perceptions Of Physical Fitness

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Register to read the introduction… The site states that various studies have been conducted to prove this hypothesis correct. Researchers from Santa Clara University and the Stanford University School of Medicine recently performed an experiment using two groups of people; one of the groups was engaged in the stressful activity of reading the names of colors printed with ink of a different color while the other group was involved in giving a brief speech. Before, during, and after the demanding tasks, pulse rate and blood pressure were taken, and the participants answered various questionnaires measuring calmness, anxiety, depression, self-esteem and perceived physical fitness. The results demonstrated that higher levels of perceived physical fitness were linked with less anxiety, less depression, and higher self-esteem, and this perceived physical fitness was associated with changes in systolic blood pressure and calmness during the course of the stress tasks. Consequently, the study suggests for those suffering from stress to not only make sure that they are exercising, but also, to check whether or not they believe themselves “physically fit” …show more content…
As a result of the experiment, women with a high WHR responded to stressors by secreting more cortisol than women with a low WHR, and as a result, these women could be at risk for conditions such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes mellitus, all illnesses related to extreme amounts of stress (Epel, McEwen, Seeman, Matthews, Castellazzo, Brownell, Bell, and Ickovics, …show more content…
However, many studies have been conducted that research this relationship. In a study conducted by Roth and Holmes (1985), 112 subjects reported stressful changes in their life for 12 months and their level of fitness was assessed. Those in particular with a low level of fitness revealed a high level of life stress all through the previous year, which was related to poorer physical health. However, the stressful events of those with higher levels of fitness had little impact on their health. In a study of adolescent girls, those engaged in frequent exercise were significantly less affected by stress-induced disturbances than those who reported infrequent exercise, where stress had debilitating effects on both physical and emotional health (Brown and Lawton, 1986). Also, in a longitudinal study of stress and well being in adolescence, Brown and Siegel (1988) found that the detrimental impact of stressful life events on health dropped as exercise levels escalated. Consequently, the conclusions from these studies would suggest that exercise and an increased fitness level help to diminish the effects of inevitable stress and aid in moderating the stress-illness

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