Military Discipline Essay

952 Words Aug 16th, 2005 4 Pages
Definition of Military Discipline
Military Discipline is a state of order and obedience existing within a command. It involves the ready subordination of the will of the individual for the good of the group. Military discipline is an extension and specialized application of the discipline demands habitual but reasoned obedience that preserves initiative and functions unfalteringly even in the absence of the commander. Discipline is created within a command by instilling a sense of confidence and responsibility in each individual. Discipline demands correct performance of duty. The need for discipline is best inculcated in individual by appealing to his sense of reason. In the few instances where appeal to reason fail, the use of
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Still, you—the leader—must think clearly and act reasonably. Self-discipline is the key to this kind of behavior.
2-47. In peacetime, self-discipline gets the unit out for the hard training. Self-discipline makes the tank commander demand another run-through of a battle drill if the performance doesn't meet the standard—even though everyone is long past ready to quit. Self-discipline doesn't mean that you never get tired or discouraged—after all, you're only human. It does mean that you do what needs to be done regardless of your feelings.

An officer or noncommissioned officer who loses his temper and flies into a tantrum has failed to obtain his first triumph in discipline.
Noncommissioned Officer's Manual, 1917
6-10. This understanding, along with Army values, forms the foundation of great units. Units that have solid discipline can take tremendous stress and friction yet persevere, fight through, and win. Fostering initiative builds on motivation and discipline. It requires subordinates' confidence that in an uncertain situation, when they know the commander's intent and develop a competent solution, the commander will underwrite the risk they take. While this principle applies to both direct and organizational leaders, the stakes are usually higher in larger, more complex organizations. Additionally, organizational leaders

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