Mexican Outlawry In The 19th Century

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Outlawry was the one of the first expression of Mexican resistance to Anglo domination. Individuals who were seen as Mexican outlaws were defined by “Eric Hobsbawn’s model of the social bandit: “ideally a young, unmarried peasant who commits an act which the state regards as criminal, but which most of his peers regard as justifiable or heroic” (Glenn 174). However, it was the Anglo injustices that forced these individuals into outlawry. Laws were imposed onto Mexicans because of the racial difference thus creating a social order naming Anglos at the top and Mexicans below them. This injustice of racial categorizing created tension and violence bringing Mexicans from both sides of the border to unite and fight for their share of rights. …show more content…
“As early as the late nineteenth century, Mexican American and Mexican immigrant workers resorted to strikes to protest abuses of the contract labor system, company stores, and “Mexican” wages” (Glenn 177). The issue of wages and working conditions was intertwined with civil rights and social justice in which Mexican workers are often in labor struggle with other non-Mexican workers but mostly by themselves. Labor protests and strikes were commonly initiated by mutualistas and organizations which brought together Mexican American and Mexican immigrant workers. Employers couldn’t tell the difference through their solidarity and thus ethnic Mexicans were even more powerful together. Despite the division between Mexican American and Mexican immigrant workers, the solidarity between them showed that they’re all just humans and could relate to one another to fight for equal rights. Ethnic unions were formed because Mexicans were disregarded by the American Federation of Labor. There were also allies such as the Industrial Workers of the World and the Communist Party. One particular agricultural labor organization, the Confederación de Uniónes Obreras Mexicanos (CUOM), focused on issues of pay and conditions but also “combined advocacy of class struggle with calls for the preservation of an autonomous cultural community in the United States” (Glenn 178). Division of race, class, and gender was only imposed on them by …show more content…
Middle- and lower-middle-class men from several Texas cities came together after their military service in World War I to create civic organizations—for example, La Orden Hijos de América (The Order of the Songs of America) and La Orden Cabaleros de América (The Order of the Knights of America). These organizations were only restricted to American citizens and only emphasized the American identities of American-born Mexicans. “While proclaiming respect for Mexico and its cultural heritage, the organizations stressed Americanism as the best route to gain respect and rights” (Glenn 178). Their purposes were to prove to Americans that they were loyal citizens and to protect the rights of Mexican Americans. Those organizations were more focused on promoting the interests of American born Mexicans and not the whole Mexican community thus dividing themselves from the distinction of being Mexican. This separation occurred to show the differences that Mexican Americans are more capable and are loyal to America because they’re not Mexicans thus deserved to be noticed and treated as citizens. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) was formed shortly after to promote Americanism and do American activities to show their loyalty as citizens. Glenn pointed out

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