Liberal Arts Education

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In America, a liberal arts degree seems to be such a demand. High schoolers are pressured to apply to many different colleges and pick a high paying/achieving degree that takes at least four years to achieve. But if you dig a little deeper into why college seems to be so important, is it really necessary to go to college for four years? Will a liberal arts degree actually benefit you and worth the years it takes it attain one? The articles “The New Liberal Arts” by Sanford J. Ungar and “Are Too Many People Going to College?” by Charles Murray go into much detail about this topic. Charles Murray expresses in his article that a liberal arts education should not be so important to everyone and that for many people, it can be very difficult and …show more content…
Ungar was the president of Goucher College, an author of several books and has worked in broadcast journalism. In his article, he expresses how a liberal arts education is necessary and important. He writes, “It is far wiser for people to prepare for change and the multiple careers they are likely to have than to search for a single job track that might one day become a dead end.” To have an education in liberal arts will give you knowledge not only in one particular field but in many multiple areas. A person will be well prepared for many different challenges and demands in a work field. He states that a liberal arts degree is very important when he writes, “But it may be only liberal education that can help lead the way back to comity and respectful conversation about issues before us.” Without our liberal education degrees, how will we have critical thinkers, planners, and problem solvers in our society? Ungar thinks that it is important for our society in America to focus on getting a Liberal Arts degree because of all the core knowledge one will receive that will help people do well in their …show more content…
Ungar expresses that everyone should have a liberal arts degree and many people have misperceptions on it. One misperception he talks about is, “The liberal arts are particularly irrelevant for low-income and first-generation college students. They, more than their more-affluent peers, must focus on something more practical and marketable.” He disagrees with that misperception when he writes about how anyone, no matter their background and where they come from, can achieve high goals such as becoming a president. Not having the best background and not doing so well in schooling isn’t a good excuse not to strive for a liberal arts degree. Murray writes that a liberal education is definitely not for everyone and in fact, hardly anyone is set up and properly ready for one. Murray writes, “He is exactly average in interpersonal and interpersonal ability.” And goes on to say that because he is not excellent in a different area that involves a liberal arts education, he should not pressure one and instead go for one that does not require a degree. Murray points out that it would be difficult for just an average student to strive for a higher level degree, but Ungar explains that just because one isn’t properly set up for higher education should not let that be an excuse to not try to achieve higher

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