Experiential Learning Theory

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Introduction
“In today’s educational context, educators must recognize the importance of experiential learning theories in order to provide learners with educational opportunities that would allow them to combine their existing knowledge and experience with their newly acquired knowledge” (Mahani, 2012: page 2).
This paper will contemplate my personal progression in writing MBA assignments in the view of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory (ELT) and Learning Style Inventory (LSI) instrument.
Literature
Writers and researchers have put plenty of time and effort to emphasize theories to enhance learning methodologies, and to conceptualize how we learn. McCarthy (2010: page 1) classifies four main paths to scrutinize learning; Personally, Information
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Akella (2010: page 2) mentions the theory hypnosis that the learner must experience the four stages in cyclical fashion sequentially, the learner transforms his experience into knowledge, action, reflection, and modification. “It provides a complete amalgamated perception on learning that joins experience, insight, reasoning, and behavior.” (Mahani, 2012: page 2)
Managerial and Professional Development (2015, p. 47) and Akella (2010: page 4) mention the critiques directed to Kolb’s model as follows; it assumes that the learning process occurs in isolation and it ignores the external and internal influencing factors just as the approaches to retain and recall information, psychodynamic, social network, gender, social status, individual willingness to learn, and cultural
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The model consists of four sequential stages; concrete experience (experiencing) (CE), reflective observation (reflecting) (RO), abstract conceptualization (thinking) (AC), and active experimentation (doing) (AE) stages. LSI instrument to conceptualize the learning styles that influence the learner experience. The model hypnosis, the learner starts the cycle with CE stages and ends up with AE stage.
Through the findings and discussions, the learning environment has stimulated the learner to reflect his experience, additionally the feedback is important to evaluate the experience; however, the learner can start the experience at any stage not necessarily CE stage, and move to another stage not necessarily in order. Furthermore, the model ignored the learner motivation, social network, and the approaches to retain and recall information, which enriched the experience. LSI instrument facilitated to conceptualize the influence of individual's preferences on the learning

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