Piaget's Theory Of Constructivism

Superior Essays
Learning takes place in various ways and forms. Learning that occurs from formed knowledge based on personal experience and individual situations is considered constructivism (Schunk, 2016). This means that learners construct or create their own learning using what they already know. Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky are two theorists that have contributed a great bit to the topic of constructivism. Scholars Jerome Bruner, who introduced discovery learning, and John Dewey have also played a role in constructivism (Snowman & Mccown, 2013).
Theorist Jean Piaget expresses that cognition depends on biological maturation, individual experience with physical environment and the social environment. He also expressed that it depends on equilibrium
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214). Incorporating Piaget’s theory of constructivism into learning and evaluating the intended audience, one must assess children on their level and then allow opportunities of learning based on the child’s level and abilities. For instance, in the infancy stage, simply introducing alphabet is enough to teach them each mark is something different even if they do not know specifics. As they age, allowing the children access to different books and reading to them, children learn that letters and words can combine to make stories. They build on their knowledge until actual reading happens through other lessons given and taught.
Constructivism has its advantages and disadvantages. The main advantage of constructivism is that sensory input is important. Students are allowed to be active learners instead of just sitting down listening to lectures. Also, with constructivism, because the lessons are interactive they are more student-centered versus lesson-centered. In essence, within constructivist environments learning is structured to suite the concepts being taught, seek the points of view for the students and adapt the curriculum to the students (Schunk,
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In scaffolding, the teacher or mentor must have a level of knowledge on the subject matter. They may be required to spend some time planning curriculums and completing lesson plans. Because the person providing the assistance should have the proper knowledge one disadvantage is that this type of guided instruction is time consuming. Also, as Berger (2011) explains, scaffolding should be the temporary support that has been modified to fit learner needs to ensure mastering of desired task. For that to happen, time and research is needed for the mentor to evaluate the level of learning already completed and the desired level to be achieved.
The main advantage of scaffolding is that it helps in supporting learning (Snowman & Mccown, 2013). Mentors are able to assist students in the learning of a difficult task by making the information easier to understand for them. This type of learning also leads the student to learn how to increase in self-efficacy as with the help of their mentor they learn different tactics so that they can construct methods of learning on their own. Also, because the student has help and support available for them, their frustration is

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