The Four Main Stages Of Child Development

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There are three main types of development which include: Cognitive, Psychosocial, and Psychosexual. Each talk about philosophers thoughts and beliefs about development. Also, what they believed the ages were that these stages of development occurred. These ages that the stages of development may take place might vary. Cognitive Development talks about the specific stages that children go through as their mind and capability to see relationships matures. This theory was made by Jean Piaget. The age range for this development does vary from child to child. There are four main stages that make up the Cognitive Development. These stages include: the Sensorimotor Stage, the Pre-operational Stage, the Concrete Operations Stage, and the Formal …show more content…
Children are able to comprehend the concepts of grouping. Formal Operations Stage is the last Cognitive Development stage. This stage happens to children between the ages of the twelve and older. Children begin to develop more abstract views of the world. They are able to apply preservation and reversibility to different types of situations, including both real and imaginary situations. Also, they grow more of a grasp of the world, as well as cause and effect. Psychosocial Development talks about the socialization of children and how it affects their sense of self. This theory was made by Erik Erikson. This type of development has eight different stages which include: Trust vs. Mistrust, Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt, Initiative vs. Guilt, Industry vs. Inferiority, Identity vs. Role Confusion, Intimacy vs. Isolation, Generatively vs. Stagnation, and Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Erikson believed that the Trust vs. Mistrust stage occurred at the ages birth to one years old. In this stage, children start to learn to trust others. If developed successfully, they gain security and confidence, but if it is not developed successfully, they may develop mistrust, anxiety, and intensified insecurities. Autonomy vs. …show more content…
This theory was created by Sigmund Freud. There are five stages, which include: Oral Stage, Anal Stage, Phallic Stage, Latency Stage, and Genital Stage. The Oral Stage occurs between the ages of birth to eighteen months. This stage is when children are focused on sucking. The Anal Stage happens to children between the ages eighteen months to three years. In this stage, children focus on removing feces. This is something that children have to learn to control. The Phallic Stage occurs within the ages three to six years old. Freud thought that this was when the pleasure zones began to switch to the genitals. The Latency Stage happens to children between the ages of six years old and puberty. This is when sexual urges remain restrained and children are mainly only playing with same gender peers. The Genital Stage occurs to children in puberty and on. This is the final stage and it is when sexual urges begin again. They are directed on to the opposite gender peers. If any of these stages were effected in different ways, if can effect the person and their

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