Down Syndrome Student Analysis

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Students benefit when they spend their school days in inclusive classrooms with Down Syndrome students because all of the students can experience varied opportunities to grow and develop which often are not found from being separated in mainstream or in self-contained classrooms. According to the National Down Syndrome Society, inclusive classrooms provide for an educational process by which all students, including those with disabilities, are educated together in general population classrooms for all of the school day. There also are generally two other main classroom setups in which Down Syndrome students can be placed. Self-contained classrooms where special needs students are grouped together and segregated from the general student populations, …show more content…
Special needs students educated together in regular classes do better academically because due to their peers assistance (PIT Journal). Down Syndrome students benefit because nonclassified students help the classified students to review and learn their schoolwork. It is only in a general education classroom that special education students receive beneficial educational and social interactions with classmates that provide for a variety of learning opportunities which are not readily available in the self-contained or mainstreamed classrooms. This inclusion helps Down Syndrome students because they are helped by someone who is close to their age and can connect easily with each other (Dwight). I believe when Down Syndrome students are placed in inclusive classrooms, every student benefits …show more content…
Inclusion can teach nonclassified children how to become more sensitive and compassionate to others who are different from them. They learn about different cultures and languages in school. People with disabilities are another aspect of our culture. The concept that all people have strengths and weaknesses, can both teach and learn, and have value, may increase students’ acceptance of their own abilities and difficulties, and increase their tolerance of diversity (Volmer). When children can learn at a young age how to accept other children with disabilities in the school environment, that understanding can translate to the outside world as well. When Down Syndrome students are kept completely separate from the rest of the student body the underlying message is that people with disabilities are outsiders. Effects on students ' social skills have been found to include improved attitudes towards peers with disabilities and a more sophisticated and improved skills in social interactions with diverse populations (Vinson).
In conclusion, I believe when Down Syndrome students are placed in inclusive classrooms, all students benefit both academically and socially from enjoyable regular, contact with one another. The benefits of inclusion are not only for the student with a disability but also for those without one. Inclusion teaches

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