Early Childhood Exclusion

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Introduction.
This literature review has been written in regards to the importance of inclusionary practices and inclusion for children with disabilities and their families within an early childhood education environment. Two of the research articles used are from New Zealand, one from Taiwan and one from Spain, they range from 2009 until present day.

This literature review explains the importance of including children with disabilities and their families within mainstream early childhood settings. It then addresses effective teaching strategies which include and excludes children with disabilities. Barriers that children and their families face in regards to access to early childhood settings are explained. It will then touch on resources
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I would like to extend my knowledge about the exclusion of children with disabilities. Therefore once I become qualified I too can work towards preventing barriers for exclusion, ensuring all children receive quality education and care they deserve. I believe parents who have children with disabilities should not feel excluded from certain services. They should be able to enrol their child wherever suits them and their child. Knowing the child will receive the quality care and education they …show more content…
It allows children and their families to feel accepted and welcome. It is perceived that disability is formed around people’s beliefs, attitudes and polices. According to our New Zealand Code of Ethics all children have rights to participate in all curriculum experiences (Early Childhood Code of Ethics National Working Group, 1996). It is generally noted that educators hold the key to inclusionary practice, this can be through their skills, attitudes and philosophies which can play a large role in supporting or hindering this. According to The United Nations Convention on the Rights of children (UNCRC) all children have rights to fully participate within their community (United Nations, 1989). With this in mind it is important educators foster strategies to promote inclusion. Huang & Diamond (2009) note that lack of support and services for children with disabilities increases the chances of exclusion for these children, although inclusion is the right thing to do. Without sufficient support and training educators were more reluctant to include children with disabilities (Huang & Diamond, 2009). Rietveld (2010) also considered inclusion as the right thing to do, within this article running record observations took place which came to the conclusion of although children with disabilities were welcome within the centre, they were getting treated differently from other

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