Disability Movement Essay

1472 Words 6 Pages
Throughout many years of history, those with disabilities were not always treated fairly or given equal opportunity. Activists around the world have worked together to achieve goals such as increased access to all types of transportation and a safer day to day environment. Equal opportunities in employment and education have been a big part of their efforts too. For many years, children with disabilities were many times segregated and not given an equal opportunity for a chance to learn and succeed in school. A disability should not limit a person’s choice to improve themselves and their intellectual capabilities. The Disability Movement and its activists have a strong purpose and history of fighting for equal rights for those who …show more content…
Many students with a disability were greatly neglected and discriminated against prior to receiving equal opportunity in education. These activists are fighting for civil rights that each human deserves. As more studies are conducted, they are finding that “..nearly 28 percent of Americans with a disability are living in poverty. 16.1 percent of those people are unemployed and many more underemployed” (Periello). It is simply unfair that those statistics even exist. The many activists who have fought hard and are continuing to fight for the Disability Movement are working to break the many barriers that prevent those with a disability to live a healthy and happy …show more content…
In 2012, 5.8 million children in the United States were receiving special education services all as result from The Disability Movement pushing for IDEA and ADA. Over 2.3 million (more than 40%) of those students are identified with having a specific learning disability (Lee). Prior to the success of ADA and IDEA, children with a disability were not able to get a proper public school education. The Disability Movement and its success with IDEA has strongly impacted schools. It is incredibly important for students with disabilities to participate and interact with ‘normal’ kids their age in a general educational classroom. This benefits both the students with disabilities and the students without. For those with disabilities, it allows them a chance to gain friendships and increase their social interactions and relationships. This also provides peer role models for behavior, social, and academic skills. This benefits the students without disabilities by increasing their understanding, appreciation, and acceptance of individual differences. Not only does it increase the acceptance of diversity but it also prepares the students for adult life in an inclusive society. Today, children with learning disabilities are accepted and welcomed into public and private schools as equals. They are given the same opportunities to learn and succeed

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