Inclusion In Special Education Case Study

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An increasing number of students with disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder are being educated in inclusive classrooms due to federal laws such as Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) and No Child Left Behind Act (NCBL) mandating that all children are placed in a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment (LRE) possible (Camargo et al., 2014). Inclusion in special education can be defined as, “the education of students with disabilities together with their nondisabled peers” (Carson, 2015, p. 1398). Special Education professionals are now legally and ethically obligated to place students in classrooms with the greatest access to typically developing students and the general curriculum. …show more content…
In a study with 35 children with ASD in support classes and 39 in regular classes from South Australia and New South Wales parents, teachers, and principals were interviewed on what they perceived as facilitators and barriers of inclusion of students with ASD. The top facilitators of inclusion described by parents, teachers and principals were related to the teacher’s abilities, levels of support from teacher assistants and support staff, and the support the student’s social skills. 53% of parents interviewed valued the school and the teachers ability to understand their child’s needs, set realistic expectations, and use appropriate strategies in the classroom to reach the students goals as the key factor to inclusion. The two next most important factors for parents were the levels of support from teacher assistants and support staff as well as support for interaction with peers, friendships, and buddy systems (Carter et al., 2014). Parent involvement and support is crucial to the success of a student with ASD therefore the factors that parents perceive to be facilitators of inclusion should be assessed before a student is placed in a general education …show more content…
50% of teachers interviewed cited their own practices or skills such as consistency in the classroom, routines, use of visual supports, and reward systems as facilitators of inclusion (Carter et al., 2014). Teachers need to be trained in research based practices specific to students with ASD and stay up to date with changes professional knowledge in order to be in accordance with the Council for Exceptional Children’s (CEC) ethical principles for special education professionals. The next most reported facilitator was again support from teacher assistants and other staff. Additionally teachers believed that the support of parents and the parents’ ability to work well with school played a major role in the success of students with ASD in the general education classroom (Carter et al., 2014). Based on the information provided, teachers place a high priority on feeling like they have enough support from teacher assistants, staff, and parents in order to best meet the needs of students with ASD. Ethically teachers are obligated to advocate for conditions and resources that will improve the learning outcomes for students with disabilities like ASD so if teachers are not receiving support they need strive to

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