Fallen Angels: The Validity Of War

Great Essays
Gracee Abeyta
Mrs. Jacobson
American Literature - Honors
2 Jan. 2018
The Validity of War
The telling of a realistic war story cannot be successful unless it truly holds light to the extremely grueling physical and emotional battles that the average American soldier undergoes. Capturing these experiences is a feat that, if accomplished, should not go without honor and admiration for decades to come. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers, published in 1988, is a novel that deserves this amount of recognition. It should be considered an American classic because it fits this “real” war story definition and shows how a soldier’s war experience as well as the war itself is cruel, brutal, and meaningless. Walter Dean Myers, originally named Walter Milton
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However, Myers was later given the recognition he deserves for the creation of this novel that accurately captures the emotional and physical battles that American soldiers came face to face with each day. For this book Myers received the Coretta Scott King Award, an honor for an outstanding literary work by an African-American author (Morton-Mollo “Walter Dean Myers.” 4). The book is taught in many high schools in the U.S. despite the controversies that have risen due to it’s graphic violence; Myers’ ability to connect with a younger audience in order to portray his important messages overshadows the novel’s “indecency” for teens (Morton-Mollo “Walter Dean Myers.” …show more content…
"Walter Dean Myers." Magill’s Survey of American Literature, Revised Edition, September 2006, pp. 1-4. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=103331MSA12249830000223&site=lrc-live.
“Banned Books Week: Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers.” IIT Chicago-Kent Law Library Blog, 1 Oct. 2015, blogs.kentlaw.iit.edu/library/2015/09/banned-books-week-fallen-angels/.
Feller, Thomas R. "Walter Dean Myers." Cyclopedia of World Authors, Fourth Revised Edition, January 2003, p. 1. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=103331CWA25999810003334&site=lrc-live.
Morton-Mollo, Sherry L. "Fallen Angels." Masterplots II: African American Literature, Revised Edition, December 2008, pp. 1-2. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=103331AFR11089640000301&site=lrc-live.
Morton-Mollo, Sherry. "Walter Dean Myers." Critical Survey of Long Fiction, Fourth Edition, January 2010, pp. 1-3. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=103331CSLF14510141000072&site=lrc-live.
Myers, Walter Dean. Fallen angels. Scholastic, 2008.
Troike, Dorothy Ruth. "Fallen Angels." Masterplots II: Juvenile & Young Adult Fiction Series, March 1991, pp. 1-2. EBSCOhost,

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