Elizabeth Blackwell: Women In The Medical Field

Improved Essays
Today, women make up a majority of the medical field. We owe this evolvement for equality to many amazing people throughout history. A key figure in opening the doors to women is Elizabeth Blackwell. Elizabeth Blackwell is most prominently known as the first American woman to receive a medical degree. She campaigned for women to enter into the medical field and eventually opened a medical college for women. It is said that Blackwell turned to medicine after a dying friend made the notion that her worst suffering would have been spared if her physician had been a women.
Elizabeth Blackwell was born in England on February 3, 1821 to Samuel Blackwell and Hannah Lane. Her family moved to America when Elizabeth was eleven and spent a good amount
…show more content…
In a world where women were viewed as inferior or not suited for certain professions, she helped paved the way for women in medicine. In today’s world, the medical field is made up with an outstanding number of women in all specialties. Although she faced much resistance from society about becoming a physician, she continued not only to maintain perseverance and professional conduct, but she made sure to share her success by creating ways for others to follow in her footsteps by taking on many predecessors. She is one of many women in history who refused to take “no” for an answer and found a way to pursue their dreams. We are still faced with opposition in today’s jobs, although more oriented in other fields such as engineering, military positions, and some research departments. She gives this struggle for equality and the idea of women in a predominantly male workforce a face and proven historical success. “The study of human nature by women as well as men commences that new and hopeful era of the intelligent co-operation of the sexes through which alone real progress can be attained and secured” (Blackwell, Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women: Autobiographical Sketches, pg. 253-254). Elizabeth Blackwell refused to let society place her in a box and established a plan to broaden the world’s horizons on social reforms and women in medicine. Her success in both have clearly made leaps and bounds for women in medicine. The fact that she is such a prominent historical figure in medicine is proof of her accomplishments. With her in mind, women today can face opposition and proceed to new beginnings and triumph in the world we live in

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Elizabeth Blackwell Essay

    • 1690 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Her journey’s throughout the medical field was not limited to one medical facility. She was instrumental in establishing the London School of Medicine for Women, which was one of the first educational institutions specifically designed to educate female physicians. She was not only interested in her career path, but also focused on creating opportunities for other women to follow in her footsteps. Blackwell’s actions provided patients with outstanding care and treatment as she cared for them to her fullest. Blackwell not only focused on her medical career, she dedicated her time to being a women’s activist.…

    • 1690 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Women In Medicine

    • 1474 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Since women apparently had little to no success in making history both of these women raised the bar and showed how women can do the same thing men can do. So even though people thought that it was not the wisest decision for these women to enter the medical field they made history. And as a result made other women want to go against the social norm and do what they have always wanted without hesitation. With this happening other women fought for their rights like: Harriet Tubman which happened a year after Blackwell became a doctor, the first national women’s rights convention in which Harriet Hunt spoke at,…

    • 1474 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Lora Sahmarani Mr. Nissen | Mrs. Kwiatkowski More than a Midwife: Elizabeth Blackwell’s Fight for Gender Equality Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell was a positive leader, advocate, and the first woman in the United States to graduate from medical college with a degree. Her exploration in the field of medicine led her to pursue her own career, ultimately allowing other women to be able to explore other opportunities in the future. Blackwell went through immense opposition with sexual prejudice while trying to become a medical practitioner, leaving women to be inspired by her leadership and earning her a spot in medical history. Despite her encounters with immense opposition in the medical field in the nineteenth century, Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman to earn her medical degree, paving the way for women's rights by exchanging her medical knowledge with other women and encouraging gender equality while exploring the field of medicine. At this period in time, a female in the medical field, which was considered a man’s job, was deemed unethical and unnecessary.…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    You must have been very proud to have opened up a medical college for women, not unlike yourself, to go to get an accredited medical education without the harsh criticism and sexism that you were forced to endure.” Indeed, Elizabeth did open up the first Women’s Medical college in America. Her hard work and dedication to paving a way for women in medicine caused countless women of her time to branch out and pursue careers in medicine. In fact, Elizabeth’s own sister, Emily Blackwell, was so inspired by her sister that she became the third woman in the US to receive her MD. “To end our conversation, I want to ask you one last question. Are you happy with your life and all of the accomplishments that you have made?” Truly, I believe this is an important question.…

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Each woman fights against the societal expectations placed on them in their own way. Both agree that women must have equal opportunities as men, and know to change the system they must fight back against it. It was very uncommon for wives to leave their husbands during the time A Doll House is set in, but Nora decides to do so anyway. She knows that for her own sake that she must leave Torvald and a superficial marriage behind to find herself. Beneatha fights against the same oppression that she faces by striving to become a doctor, and taking pride in her racial identity.…

    • 914 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Gloria became more engaged because of the fact that she had an abortion and with through the entire experience on her own. After talking with other ladies and doing a hearing on it, she formed the National Political Caucus which worked on women issues. Using this organization to help with bringing women’s issues to the light. Gloria is the type of woman that wants to help females with experiences that they may or may not have went through with no help. A phenomenal woman is a woman who strive for success, achieve greatness, act as a mentor to other females, and is helpful to their environment.…

    • 523 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Contraception And Abortion

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Due to scientific developments such as this, along with the women 's rights movement, the practice of medicine and care givers would begin to change by the end of the 19th century. No longer would women and men have to be “diagnosed and treated similarly” (Borst and Jones 24) as pioneering women such as Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell would begin to step into the field of medicine. Blackwell was the first woman physician to be educated in a regular medical college (graduating in 1849) and then establishing the first Womens Medical College to train other…

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Like many nurses of the 19th century Isabel Hampton Robb was an immigrant to the United States when she began her training as a nurse. Her first formal educational experience was at the New York training school for nurses at Bellevue Hospital (Wolf, 20XX). Isabel Robb was a prime example of a professional woman during her era. Her prestigious role as a teacher and a nurse became very evident early in her career. She was born a leader and role model for those nurses who strived to become effective in implementing change in the nursing profession.…

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The role of the women in healthcare has evolved considerably from antiquity to modernity. Whether women earned the title of nurse, doctor, caregiver or obeah women, their place in history is one of influence and silent courage. Women have been perceived as being in the shadow, or in positions of low standing in relation to that of men. They are spoken of as being the “weaker” and more docile of the sexes; yet have still managed to operate in positions of power and influence. In the struggle for a place in science and medicine, men have always proved to be more triumphant candidates.…

    • 2589 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    83). Kellet et al. also argued “the disproportionate number of men in nursing leadership positions and in “high status specialties" such as critical care, emergency, nurse anesthesia, and nursing education are often cited as evidence for men’s relative gender advantage” (83). This will shape my future career by causing me to work extra hard to get a promotion over a male colleague or to simply have good relationships with higher up bosses. Gender inequality and patriarchy are two of the main issues that fire up the feminist in me.…

    • 823 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays