Women In Medicine

Superior Essays
Women and Medicine

Throughout history women have always been seen as not being equal to men. Men have been above women when it came to a point where women felt as though they should be given the right to do what they want to do and not fall into society’s norm. A big part of a breakthrough in women’s rights would have to be when women stepped u to the plate and started earning their medical degrees. Since the medical field was something men were only allowed to do besides women just staying home with their sick kids and other family members, women felt as though they wanted to be needed. So in the 1850’s women decided to earn their degrees and show men that they are able to do the same things they could do and fight against the social norm.
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They also opened up about 10 hospitals only runned by women even though there were still some arguments that would occur about women being in the medical field. Although there was still discrimination with women being in the medical field and they would be in hostile environments that never pushed women away from wanting to earn their degrees. According to an article______ written by_______ “ by the end of the 19th century 5% of American physicians were women numbering over 7,000. the numbers dipped a bit after WWII and continued through the 1950’s. There was a resurgence of women attending medical school in the late 1960’s and 1970’s with the revival of feminism. In 1974 22.4% of medical school enrollees were women, up from the 9.1% in 1969. Currently the admission rates are up, with over 46% of applicants being …show more content…
Since women apparently had little to no success in making history both of these women raised the bar and showed how women can do the same thing men can do. So even though people thought that it was not the wisest decision for these women to enter the medical field they made history. And as a result made other women want to go against the social norm and do what they have always wanted without hesitation. With this happening other women fought for their rights like: Harriet Tubman which happened a year after Blackwell became a doctor, the first national women’s rights convention in which Harriet Hunt spoke at,

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