Do Schools Kill Creativity Speech Analysis

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The speaker of “Do Schools Kills Creativity?” is Sir Ken Robinson, he is a British author and speaker. The specific purpose of the speech is to show how creativity is just as important as other academic subjects to a student. The central idea is to inform adults, specifically teachers and parents, on how schools kill creative minds by tapping on the more technical subjects such as Math, Science, and literature. He employed impromptu when giving the speech and used topical as his organizational pattern because his main points could be used in any order without disrupting his tone. Sir Ken Robinson started the speech by making people laugh through humor. The speech was relevant to the audience because it focused on the lives of children and …show more content…
Thus, informing her parents and advising them to enroll her to a dance school so she can learn through dance and right now she is a famous choreographer. To sum up the speech we can see that the central idea is to inform adults, specifically teacher and parents on how schools kill creative minds by tapping on the more technical subjects such as Math, Science, and Literature while not helping out the students that are more into creative arts. Some major points Sir Ken Robinson addresses is the fact that we shouldn’t be afraid of failure or fear because that is how we learn and create valuable ideas. Also, we educate out the creativity that we used to possess by absorbing more socially standard subjects. Lastly, the point that creativity is now as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status. The overall impression was more related to the topic because the information that was given was relevant to what the actual speech was about and what people were expecting. In the end, this speech is very important and I highly suggest others to view it because of how people might relate to the idea behind the speech which is how schools kill creativity, and how creativity is just as important as

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