Cloning Technology

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Technology today now allows us to address the idea of cloning. Cloning is creating an identical genetic copy of an organism or a cell. The process of this is there will be three subjects A, B, and C a body cell will be taken from A, the DNA will be extracted then an egg cell will be taken from B the nucleus removed. The DNA from A is fuse with the egg cell from B the fused cell develops into an embryo when it is placed in C the surrogate and then the clone is of subject A. To get to cloning there had been a lot of research to led up to that idea. First, in 1885 the first demonstration of artificial embryo twinning conducted by Hans Adolf Eduard Dreisch on sea urchins. He discovered how shaking two sea urchin embryos could separate them. After the separation the cells grew into two different sea urchins. Next, in 1902 Hans Spemann experimented on salamander to discover artificial embryo twinning in a vertebrate. He created a noose with a baby hair and used it to separate the salamander’s embryo. The cells then grew into adult salamanders. His experiment showed more complex animals embryos could still be twinned to make identical organisms. Hans Spemann also discovered that the cell nucleus controlled the embryonic development. He once again in 1928 used a baby hair to tie a noose, he …show more content…
Couples that can’t have children have another option of on how they can have children. There is also the advantage of saving an endangered species. We would also have the possibilities of replacing damaged and vital organs with cloned ones. Now we address the unethical side of this procedure. There is the testing to clone Dolly there was 277 attempts this suggest how many failed attempts will there be to clone a human. Some of the mammals that were cloned had health problems and even reduced their life span. Plus, it is against the will of nature, the clone has no say in being created or its own

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