Essay Bill Russell

754 Words Mar 25th, 2013 4 Pages
l http://americanhistory.about.com/od/civilrights/a/civilrights1.htm

During the 1950s and 1960s, a number of important civil rights' activities occurred that helped position the Civil Rights movement for greater recognition. They also led either directly or indirectly the passage of key legislation. Following is an overview of the major legislation, Supreme Court cases, and activities that occurred in the Civil Rights movement at the time. * Sit-Ins - Throughout the South groups of individuals would request services that were denied to them because of their race. This was a popular form of protest. One of the first and most famous occurred at Greensboro, North Carolina where a group of college students, both white and black, asked
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'... by strictly adhering to non-violent tactics, blacks claimed the moral high ground ...'
The civil rights movement was bold and brave. In the South, whites outnumbered blacks by four-to-one and monopolised state power. But by strictly adhering to non-violent tactics, blacks claimed the moral high ground and gained the tactical advantage. Modelled partly on the tactics used by Gandhi in India, but mainly inspired by Christian faith and optimism about America's democratic promise, the civil rights movement tried to make racial segregation unworkable, even if it meant ignoring judges and defying policemen. Blacks now willingly went to jail rather than submit to racial segregation.
As blacks in the South became increasingly confident about the sympathy of the outside world, their protests snowballed. In 1960, black college students staged 'sit-ins' at cafeterias that served only whites. In 1961 integrated teams of black and white travellers staged bus journeys, or 'Freedom Rides', across the South, challenging segregation laws along the way.
'... the world was sickened by the sight of white mobs and club-wielding policemen attacking non-violent, hymn-singing marchers.'
In the face of these challenges, whites often reacted by arresting the protesters, and sometimes by attacking them. The Ku Klux Klan revived: it set off bombs and

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