Best Practices In Daniel Goleman's Working With Emotional Intelligence

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Many companies, organizations and individuals attempt to raise their emotional intelligence by attending trainings. However not all trainings are created equally with some better preparing individuals than others. In the Best Practices chapter of his book Working with Emotional Intelligence. Daniel Goleman lays out a 14 step plan to learn and teach emotional intelligence in the best way possible. This plan assesses the learner, instructs the learner and finally implements and reinforces what the learner has been taught. The first steps involve assessing the required and current state of emotional intelligence for an individual. Step 1 is what Goleman calls assessing the job. The object of this step is to assess what is necessary to do a job …show more content…
In the fourth step we gauge the readiness of the learner. “There are four levels of readiness: obliviousness or outright resistance, contemplating a change at some vague point in the future, ripeness to formulate a plan, and readiness to take action” (Goleman, 2006, p. 264). Goleman says individuals who are not ready to learn should not be forced into instruction as their resistance will hinder their learning. Motivation is the fifth step. During this step the instructor motivates the learners to improve their emotional intelligence. “[T]he more motivated people are to learn, the greater the effectiveness of the training for them” (Goleman, 2006, p. 265). The next step involves making change self-directed. According to Goleman “We change most effectively when we have a plan for learning that fits our lives, interests, resources and, goals” (2006, p. 266). For this reason, we shouldn’t take the cookie cutter approach to teaching or learning, but find a method that works best for each …show more content…
Step 7 helps the learner to focus on clear manageable goals. Goleman states “Those who attempt changes in whopping doses set themselves up for failure” (2006, p. 267). Therefore, when a person is trying to change something in their lives they must break it down into smaller steps. For example, if the individual decided to focus on having better time management they would not focus on the ambiguous goal, but rather they would need to focus their energy on something such as spending less time on social media (Goleman, 2006, p. 268). Step 8 helps the learner prevent relapsing back into their old habits. Throughout this step it is necessary for the learner to realize that a small step back does not mean ultimate failure. In step 9 the learner is provided with feedback to help gauge how well they are changing. During step ten the learner is encouraged to practice what they learn. This step is important because we change over time and through doing rather than hearing (Goleman, 2006, p. 270). In step 11 the learner arranges support by developing a relationship with a mentor. This allows both people to learn and improve together. In step 12 the instructor or organization provides positive models for the learner. Goleman says this is important because “we pattern our behavior after high-status people in our organization” (2006, p. 275). The 13th step encourages and reinforces good EQ.

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