Analysis Of The Dove Campaign For Real Beauty

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The Dove Campaign for Real Beauty is the product of a chain reaction that started with a global study that came out in September about women and beauty. The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report came to the conclusion “that the definition of beauty had become limiting and unattainable” and that “only 2% of women around the world would describe themselves as beautiful,” (yellow). In response to this global study Dove launched their Campaign for Real Beauty in September 2004 with what is known today as the “tick box” billboards, “which debuted in Canada and spread across the United States and United Kingdom,” (green). The billboards presented real women with appearances outside of the stereotypical norm with “two tick-box options next to them …show more content…
Late 2006 “a news and media furor erupted when Spain banned overly thin models” from the fashion runway which led Dove to produce “a compelling short film, Evolution” (yellow). In this one minute and fourteen second video a real woman is transformed into what is considered as the perfect model. The film starts with the regular woman with no makeup on, so all of her “flaws” as society would call them are seen. Then the video is sped up as professionals fix her complication, eyes, eyebrows, lips, and hair. The hair goes through many transformations through the video, demonstrating how much work is put into making her look like a model. The part of the short ad that really captures how unrealistic society’s perception of beauty is how even after the professionals finish their makeover and she is a gorgeous women they elongate her neck, make her lips fuller, and her eyes bigger through Photoshop on the computer. If professional makeup artists and hairstylists cannot make a regular women beautiful by society’s standards, then what hope to the rest of the female population have in making themselves beautiful? The ad ends with everything fading into black and these words come on screen “no wonder our perception of beauty is distorted” (red). This ad blames the movie, television, and magazine industries for …show more content…
In the Real Beauty Sketches a forensic sketch artist draws pictures of women based off how they describe themselves and then how another person who just meet them described them. The film then uses compare and contrast to make its point and the two pictures are placed side by side. When describing themselves women tend to use harsher words and thus their picture turns out to show a fat, closed off, and upset looking women, but the pictures from another’s description show a pretty, open, and happy woman. One women in the ad makes the statement that how women perceive themselves affects how they act, who their friends are, what kind of job they apply for, and how they treat others. The way someone sees themselves impacts their whole lives and this commercial proves to women that they are “more beautiful than [they] think” so they should be living a happy and carefree life (weird color). Dove’s next film continues to improve how women think about themselves, especially teens and their moms. Dove challenged teenaged girls and their mom’s at a local high school to take a selfie without any improvements or filters and submit it to Dove. A week later Dove hosted a photo gallery after school. All of the selfie’s submitted where blown up and hanging form the celling. People then went around and attach post-it notes to the pictures with

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