Analysis Of St. Lucy's Home For Girls By Karen Russell

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St Lucy’s Home for Girls is a safe haven for warewolf girls to learn and change into better humans. Claudette, a student at St Lucy's Home For Girls follows the nuns curriculum closely but sometimes she strays from it. This short story written by Karen Russell follows three girls as they learn please and adapt to their new way of living, all of them heading in separate directions. In the beginning of claudettes journey everything is new and different however She shortly learns that hard work is crucial to adaptation and that from that point on the stakes would be high. As her progress moves forward, she began to realize that she needed to go her separate way to succeeded and when she was finished at St Lucy’s she had fulfilled her journey. …show more content…
The curriculum for Stage Two expects the girls be stressed, irritated and uncomfortable in their new environment. The girls are expected to work hard adjusting to their new culture. Claudette’s behavior in Stage Two is directly parallel to that described in the Curriculum, “We would snarl at each other for no reason. I remember how disorienting it was to look down and see two square-toed shoes instead of my own four feet” (Russell 229). Claudette is recognizing the changes she and her sisters were going through during their time in Stage Two and she is describing how she feels. She is developing the same as the curriculum because she is feeling disoriented, uncomfortable and is irritated with her pack members. She tries to contain herself by keeping the new skills she learned in her head and reminding herself of what she has already learned, “Do not chew on your new penny loafers. Do not. I stumbled around in a daze, my mouth black with shoe polish” (Russell 229). At this moment Claudette was attempting to follow what she had been taught however she could not retain herself and she gave in, straying away from the curriculum. This shows that claudette was not exactly the same to what the nuns had expected, she was similar in some ways but not …show more content…
At this point the girls at St. Lucys are expected to start rejecting their new way of living, wondering how anyone could live that way and they begin to feel that their own lifestyle holds superiority. Claudette, nervous about meeting other girls shows a perfect example of this, “There were so many things we could do wrong! And the rules here were different depending on which humans we were with; dancing or no dancing, checkers playing or no checkers playing, pumping or no pumping” (Russell 237). During her journey through Stage Three we see Claudette beginning to believe and follow the same ideas that are matching what is seen in the Curriculum. She worries about meeting new people because she doesn't understand how they could live any differently from her. Claudette also shows that she follows what the curriculum says when the text talks about the dance proposed by the nuns, “I felt a low mad anger at the nuns. They knew we werent ready to dance the brothers; we weren't even ready to talk to them. Things had been so much simpler in the woods” (Russell 238). This shows the close relationship between claudette and the curriculum because it shows her pushing away the host culture that the nuns are trying to help them learn and it also shows her rejecting it. During Stage Three the girls are somewhat lost and at a low spot, however they gather a greater understanding of their new

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