Lusus Naturae And St. Lucy's Home For Girls Raised By Wolves: Character Analysis

There is a thin line between normal and abnormal. Normality is completely relative to the society in which one exists. Each culture has its own definition of average and each person is expected to live up to that definition. When someone does not meet that expectation, they are often ostracized from the group and labeled an outcast, or even a monster. Although the “monster” itself faces many struggles throughout life, the family of the “monster” is often left conflicted between fitting in with society and supporting their loved one. These familial struggles can be seen in Margaret Atwood’s “Lusus Naturae” and Karen Russell’s “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves.” While each family faces the same struggle, their ways of coping with …show more content…
Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” is a story of a family that is unable to survive the conflicts brought upon them when faced with the misfortune of being labeled monsters. Unlike the characters in Atwood’s story, the characters in Russell’s story are removed from a society where they are seen as normal and because an outside society sees them as monsters. The story takes place at a home run by nuns where girls, who were born to and raised by werewolves, are taught how to act like humans. Although their parents accepted them as humans, they wanted their children to have better lives, more normal, human lives, than they were able to provide for them. In order to give them that, they accepted the offer for their children to be reformed from the nuns (Mays 238). This put the entire group of girls in the unique position of being considered monsters, regardless of them being the majority, and being forced to change, due to the fear of disappointing their parents after all they had done for them. Although the adjustment period was expected to vary a little from girl to girl, there were some characters who did better, and some who did worse than others. Jeanette, the oldest sister, was quick to adjust to human life. She had a much easier time leaving behind her werewolf behavior and learning the new, human behavior than her sisters (Mays 239-240). Mirabella, the youngest sister, had a very difficult time adjusting to human life. She never seemed to be able to, …show more content…
When they first arrived at the home, Clarissa expressed concern about her sisters’, but over time, that concern became nothing more than pity (Mays 245).The girls’ desire to be accepted into their new society caused them to turn against each other. Instead of helping each other, they began to look out only for themselves. After being told they were monsters and they needed to change, it was, in fact, becoming more human that turned them into monsters. Mirabella’s lack of adjustment allowed her to see the monsters they were becoming. As they ridiculed her and distanced themselves, only Mirabella was able to see humans were the true

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