Analysis Of St. Lucy's Home For Girls Raised By Wolves

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In Karen Russell’s fictional book, “St. Lucy’s Home For Girls Raised by Wolves”, she tells the story of how werewolf girls are taught how to adapt to be more human-like. Claudette has truly conformed into the human ways the nuns at St. Lucy’s have taught her. The passage tells the struggles and accomplishments that Claudette faces and that how the rules will make her more human. Within the first three epigraphs, Claudette faces many struggles of lycanthropic culture shock in her educational journey at St. Lucy’s. One of the main struggles Claudette faces is on Page 230, (Stage 2),”..we drank gallons of bathwater as part of a collaborative effort to mark our territory. We puddled up the yellow carpet of old newspapers. But later, when we returned …show more content…
Who would get penalized with negative Skill Points? Exactly.” This was a test for Claudette. Claudette didn’t know it at the time. Claudette has issues of walking on her two legs, and Mirabella attacks her. When Mirabella starts trying to strangle the ducks, the nuns think Claudette will not be able to contain herself and go join Mirabella. Since killing animals comes from their origins, they are testing Claudette’s resistance to what happens around her. Despite all the struggles Claudette has to face, she has several accomplishments as well. One of the accomplishments is on Pages 237-238 (Stage 3), “ Every Friday, the girls who had learned how to ride a bicycle celebrated by going on chaperoned trips into town.” The nuns had explained to the girls that learning how to ride bicycles meant they were becoming more human-like. The nuns also told the girls that once they learn how to ride bicycles, they never would forget, and the same thing goes with being more like a human. Another accomplishment that Claudette made is one on Page 240 (Stage 3), “And we’d howl along with the choir, hurling every pitted thing within us at the stained …show more content…
Lucy’s, it shows that Claudette has been rehabilitated. There are several different ways the text shows the reader how Claudette has truly conformed. The first piece of evidence is found on Page 2 (Stage 5), “the sisters gave me a special pass to go visit the parents. The woodsman had to accompany me; I couldn’t remember how to find the way back on my own.” This shows that Claudette has conformed because a wolf’s natural instinct is to find their way home without any help, however, Claudette couldn’t. She had to have someone go with her to help her find her way back. Another piece of evidence that shows Claudette has conformed is found on Page 246 (Stage 5), “My mother recoiled from me, as if I was a stranger. TRRR? She sniffed me for a long moment.” This is another example of proof that Claudette has truly conformed. Wolves use smell to recognize others. Claudette’s own mother backs away from her like she’s a stranger. Claudette has changed if her mother don’t recognize her. The final piece of evidence that proves Claudette has truly conformed, is found on Page 246 (Stage 5), “So,” I said, telling my first human lie. “I’m home.” This particular piece of evidence definitely shows that Claudette has conformed. Animals can’t tell lies, but humans can. Meaning, since she went to St. Lucy’s, she has learned the human trait to lie. Also, the evidence says “telling my first human lie”, this shows that this isn’t the first or the last

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