Jacques Derrida

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    (Ramsey, 2000, p.173). Thus, according to radical feminist, the passive nature ascribed to females, enabled the “patriarchal status quo” (Ramsey, 2000, p.174), of women centering on the male. Giving normalcy to masculinity and deviation to femininity. In addition, this separation of masculinity from femininity is also a large point of criticism towards Freudian theory. This is because, as noted by Ramsey (2000), feminist such as, Helene Cixous, draw attention to “a whole series of terms that operate around a simple binary opposition: woman/passive, man/active” (Ramsey, 2000, p.177). It is this binary opposition, as pointed out by Cixous and Jacque Derrida, that results in a black and white type of thinking, with one trait ascribe to ‘good’ and the other ‘bad’ (Male being ‘good and female being ‘bad’). This type of thinking leads to what Derrida terms, ‘violent hierarchy’ (Ramsey, 2000, p.177). Similar to this, poststructuralist and queer theory critique this binary opposition of Freudian theory as harmful, as it creates a scheme of normality for heterosexuality, positioning homosexuality ( or any other type of sexuality) as deviate (as described by Freud; homosexuality occurring due to a “problem” in normal development). Nonetheless, Freudian theory is not all bad in the eyes of feminist. As wrote in Ramsey’s article (2000), feminist Juliet Mitchell, points out that it is the viewpoint of an individual which moulds psychoanalysis “as the justification of the status…

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    appropriate without trying to stand in for the animal or stop the harm altogether. It’s about experiencing the pain to understand what humans need to ask forgiveness for the wickedness against animals. Haraway uses a variety of evidence to support her arguments. She uses humanism ideas and humanist frameworks to show how animals shouldn’t be treated like objects to support her first argument around ethical obligations. Haraway talks about the OncoMouse to talk about the role of appropriate…

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    “A Poison Tree” by William Blake is ostensibly dealing with the narrator’s refusal to communicate his anger to a tree, but the overdetermined nature of the words Blake uses makes a final, correct determination of meaning impossible. In this paper, through a utilization of Derrida’s methods set forth in works such as Spectres of Marx and Dissemination, I will examine how the contradictory imperatives contained within the metaphors in this poem draw a reader away from their initial assumption…

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    performance to ‘make sense’, in one way or another. In future work I would really like to deconstruct these expectations, and create something that challenges modern audiences’ way of thinking about theatre. Since these expectations are based on the forms of realism and naturalism, I would use an absurdist approach to oppose this conditioned way of thinking. Jacques Derrida’s Deconstruction Theory is a way of analysing a text, and “exposing the instability of the meaning” (CITATION HERE), which…

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    Figurative language, as a core pillar of language, has played a major part in the development, discovery and creation of most, if not all the concepts in our real world today. Nietzsche, Plato and Aristotle, are three well noted philosophers who all believed that a great extent of our knowledge and everything that we know today and believe to be true is in someway metaphors and illusions. They all understood the strong bond that knowledge and metaphors had. However, they each viewed metaphors…

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    In Walter Mignolo’s reading “Epistemic Obdience, Independent Thought and De-Colonial Freedom” he says “decolonialty is called a “programmatic” of delinking from contemporary legacies of coloniality.” He says, it is a “response to needs unmet by the modern Rightist or Leftist government.” I think what he means by Epistemic Obdience is that, it is the decolonial way of thinking which recognizes and implements reason, which eliminates the strong tendency to think that Western European way of…

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    Heidegger sought to radicalize the traditional understanding of what it means to be human and the transform the ‘common sense’ approach held by the tradition by reawakening the question of the meaning of being; however, he arrived too early. Even though his unfinished edifice was successfully nailed on the door of Cartesian tradition long ago; the discussion fell, and is still falling, upon deaf ears. This split with the tradition led him to a disagreement with his old master Edmund Husserl…

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    6: Poststructuralist Lenses An Absolutely Ordinary Poststructuralist Deconstruction The Text: An Absolutely Ordinary Rainbow – Les A. Murray Poststructuralist theory concerns itself with dismantling texts through questioning truth and reality, contradicting itself until the meaning is unstable or non-existent. In the poem An Absolutely Ordinary Rainbow by Les A. Murray, the notions of truth and reality are questioned through a silent narrator guiding the reader through a scene of a man…

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    General into session in 1788. This was the first time they had met since 1614 which suggest that the fiscal situation was dire. The Estates General meeting makes the fiscal crises also a political one as most of the attention was focused on various parties defining their position. Although it was clear that the parlements and nobility didn’t want to pay any taxes as they questioned Calonnes policies even after explaining the financial situation of France. After been exempt from tax for many…

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    In Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, the protagonist, John “Scottie” Ferguson, falls in love with a falsified image of a woman named Madeline Elster. Madeline’s true name is Judy Barton, a woman payed by Gavin Elster to impersonate his wife and portray her as mentally unstable enough for Scottie to believe she committed suicide while the real Madeline Elster was in reality murdered by Gavin himself. Judy Barton uses her body, appearance, and mannerisms to create the character of Madeline in the image…

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