Irish diaspora

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    Irish Diaspora History

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    The Irish Diaspora in the US is massive with the 1990 census totalling an immense 43 million Americans consider themselves to be Irish American which at the time equated to roughly 19% of the American population(Feargal Cochrane 2007:218). Beyond just equating for a fifth of the American population, a third of American presidents having heritage to Ireland with four specifically having ties to what is now the Republic of Ireland while the other 12 are linked to Northern Ireland. Despite the fact that most presidents find themselves linked to Northern Ireland, this meant that when Clinton came into office in 1993, it meant that the US now had a president who had interests vested in the conflict that 43 million Americans were also interested in(John DeWind and Renata Segura 2014:99-100). When considering all of this the immense political power of the Irish Diaspora in the US becomes apparent as they not only have the population to influence the government but also people in places of power all the way up to the president with the ability to change the government 's…

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    Irish Diaspora Influence

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    The Diaspora’s Influence on the Peacemaking Efforts In terms of aiding in peace, the Irish diaspora did a few different things that were absolutely vital to the establishment of peace in Ireland as well as the creation and signing of the Good Friday Agreement. Firstly to start it is important to note how important the US was in the development of peace. The US was not some small influence or bit part, but rather they were the “critical enabler and catalyst” for the peace talks that happened in…

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    of the world 's most popular saints (Catholic Online). He is celebrated every year on March 17th, the anniversary of his death. However the reasons his life is celebrated have greatly changed since the first Saint Patrick 's Day was established by the Church in 1631 (Ashley Ross). He was originally revered for bringing catholicism to Ireland, but today his missionary work is widely forgotten and he has instead become the symbol of Irish pride. Whether it be due to the luck of the Irish or being…

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    Ireland The Great Famine

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    The potato, a simple starch to some, mass murderer to others. It is often hard to believe that simple things such as potatoes can be such a devastating thing to engulf a nation. This is of course the Great Hunger, also known as the Great Famine. It was one if not the most devastating events in Irish history. Costing Ireland an estimated 800,000 lives to hunger , and even more emigrating out to other nations. Though this number does not stack up to other tragedies in size, this made up roughly 10…

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    Ireland. It was the beginning of the greatest famine Europe would face in the 19th century. In a mere five years the potato harvest failed four times. During the famine, “... over one million Irish perished and a further two million fled the land, never to return.” (Nally, David. “That Coming Storm”). In just under five years, three million people were either dead or had immigrated. Needless to say the Potato Famine forever scarred Ireland and changed her course in history. Researchers have…

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    Essay On Five Points

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    During the Civil War times, New York was full of many slums, including Five Points in Manhattan. It was full of gangs, crimes and several bars. It was full of many Irish immigrants trying to escape the Great Famine in Ireland. Five Points was considered one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in New York. This paper will tell you all about the neighborhood of Five Points. Five Points was completely made up of immigrants. Irish people came to escape the Great Famine, and many of them also lived…

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    The great famine or the great hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland between 1845 and 1852. [1] Mainly the Irish were farmers and their major dependent was on farming but what changed the situation is the number of historical reasons. During the famine, approximately 1 million people died and a lot of them emigrated from Ireland, causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%. [2] The famine was caused by a potato disease commonly known as…

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    lives they sought. Citizens strongly desired the freedom to practice any religion of their choice, to speak freely without restriction or unethical consequence, and to have a say in certain decisions the government could make. What better place would offer these things than the New World’s very own United States of America? During the later years of the eighteenth century to the early 20th century, the population of the United States was increasing rapidly; numerous immigrants were entering the…

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    In 1845, the Great Famine began, leaving an everlasting mark on the Irish people and the political landscape of their country. The potato crop, which sustained much of Ireland’s population, stopped growing, leading to mass starvation and the death of over a million people. In The Wonder by Emma Donoghue, Anna O’Donnell is born near the end of this national tragedy and survives, but later chooses to starve herself, much to the despair of her nurse Lib. Similarly, the movie Some Mother’s Son…

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    In the book “Why Ireland starved: a quantitative and analytical history of the Irish economy, 1800-1850” the author Joel Mokyr tries to assess why the Great Famine of Ireland from 1845-1852 was so disastrous. Mokyr is an economic historian and as a result, the book is from an economic perspective and does not consider other factors outside of the economy as causes tot the famine. The majority of the book focuses on the lead up to the event and it is not until the last chapter when Mokyr…

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