Phytophthora infestans

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    history in the previous century, we can see that they tried as much as they can to remove and erase this crisis from it. Its effects permanently changed the island's cultural landscape. The famine entered folk memory as the whole island was then part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. But eventually they were able to get rid of Britain’s control and gain independence in the next century. The potato was introduced to Ireland as a garden crop. It was widespread as a supplementary rather than a food. However, it became a base food of the poor, especially in winter. The large dependency on this single crop, and the lack of genetic variability among the potato plants in Ireland, were two of the reasons why the emergence of Phytophthora infestans had such devastating effects in Ireland and less severe effects elsewhere in Europe. [3] The potato's spread was essential to the development of the system, supporting cheap workforce, but at the cost of lower living standards [4]. But it was essentially a potato wage that shaped the expanding of the agrarian economy. Approximately 33% of production, amounting to 5,000,000 tons was normally used How might the government act? Before examining this issue the government might have prohibited the export of grain from Ireland, especially during the winter, when there was little food in the country and before large supplies of foreign grain began to arrive [4]. Once there was sufficient food in the country the government…

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    like the life of George Phillips and something this major like Irish immigration close enough to have a direct relation to each other. Irish immigrant unskilled labor was one of the most prominent factors in the success of George Phillips livelihood. The main factor that influenced this great migration wave out of Ireland in the 1840’s was the great potato famine. This is a very heavily researched topic among historians because of how significant it was to the shaping of the history of both…

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    Ireland The Great Famine

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    raise their population, and it gave them a sustainable crop that not only provided to them but was also a valuable export to other countries, such as Britain. With all this good to the country it seemed to be a reliable substance, and that led to potatoes becoming a part of everyone’s daily meal. This of course meant the poorer ate more potatoes, and the upper class ate less, but in the whole, Irelands diet was largely based around the potato. This became the main problem for Ireland, and it…

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    In many Eastern countries, strict laws formerly prevented people from being able to live the wonderful, fulfilling lives they sought. Citizens strongly desired the freedom to practice any religion of their choice, to speak freely without restriction or unethical consequence, and to have a say in certain decisions the government could make. What better place would offer these things than the New World’s very own United States of America? During the later years of the eighteenth century to the…

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    One of the most pressing issues occuring in Ireland during the mid 1840s to the early 1850s, was the Irish potato famine. There is some debate over whether the British were to blame for the mass emigration of the Irish, or that this emigration was bound to happen anyway. Many historians have established their positions on this issue, including Christine Kinealy and Hasia R. Diner. Kinealy, the author of This Great Calamity: The Irish Famine 1845-52, argues that the British are to blame for…

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    INTRODUCTION Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and Potato (Solanum tuberosum, L.) are the most economically important vegetable crops in Egypt and the most widely grown vegetables in the world. The disturbance of its production affects severely it's local and export impact, because it is considered a very important consumption crop with high nutritional value and a potential export crop for the Egyptian farmers. In Egypt about 20% of total area devoted for vegetable production is cultivated…

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    The Irish Potato Famine

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    000 people left Ireland and went to install themselves in other countries which included Canada. When the Irish people came to Canada, they had an awkward welcoming. Some people accepted them with open arms and respect while others were nervous and afraid. In this essay, I will explain why the welcoming of the Irish people, in Canada, in the 19th century, was beneficial and important to the county, according to today’s standards. In order to do so, I will explain the positive impacts that the…

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    The Irish people were faced with many problems in their home countries of Ireland that caused them to migrate to the United States. The first wave of people that migrated to the United States in the nineteenth century were Protestants, political refugees, and Catholic peasants. Most of these people were farmers that had their land taken from them, or their landlords no longer leased the land because of an interest in grazing. According to the textbook A Different Mirror: A History of…

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    In 1845, the Great Famine began, leaving an everlasting mark on the Irish people and the political landscape of their country. The potato crop, which sustained much of Ireland’s population, stopped growing, leading to mass starvation and the death of over a million people. In The Wonder by Emma Donoghue, Anna O’Donnell is born near the end of this national tragedy and survives, but later chooses to starve herself, much to the despair of her nurse Lib. Similarly, the movie Some Mother’s Son…

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    Immigration Between 1846 and 1852 there was a fungus was destroying Ireland's potato crops which is known as the great famine. During these years, the Irish dealt with starvation, poverty, and disease. And because of these conditions thousands of Irish fled to America. The Irish immigration experience was very hard. Many came to America with few skills besides cooking, cleaning, and they had just enough knowledge to work in factories. They constantly had to deal with bigotry and stereotypes.…

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