Foreign-born Japanese

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    Part One There are many differences between the American and Japanese culture. One must never assume that any one culture is the same, even if the two culture appear similar on the surface. American and Japanese cultures appear similar on the surface. But if one looks any deeper than surface level, it is very easy to see that the two cultures are as different as any two cultures can be. In this section three key differences will be discussed between American and Japanese culture. The author will also discuss barriers of sharing the gospel in the Japanese culture. First, Japan is a collectivist nation (Rogers and Steinfatt, 87). This means that Japanese citizens are group minded. When a decision in is made in Japanese culture there is a great deal of time spent on considering what is best for the group as a whole. This is completely different than the American individualistic mindset. In America there is more of an emphasis put on the induvial. One of the most important ideas in Japanese culture is Harmony (Rogers and Steinfatt, 87). The typical Japanese citizen would go about their day trying to promote harmony…

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    Hitomaro’s poem is important in it’s own right, it is vital to understand the cultural context in which it took place. Thus, to further understand one of “the most touching poems in any language,” it is vital to explore the ancient Japanese view of death in relation to American beliefs and in relation to Hitomaro’s poem (461). Westerners seem to exclusively believe death to be a touchy subject while Asians believe death can have multiple interpretations. In America, funerals are somber…

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    In Japan, he is often admitted the greatest writer in modern Japanese history. He has had a profound effect on almost all of important Japanese writers…

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    you have Japan that has thousands of years of history and deep sense of tradition. Then you have America when put into comparison to Japan. When it comes to age is like a child and American culture is consistently changing and being influenced. I am not saying that Japanese culture has not changed over the years, but America is a melting pot, meaning that is influenced by hundreds of different ideas and beliefs making these two countries almost like night and day. One big example about the…

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    During World War Two, millions of Japanese-Americans were imprisoned. The American Government were worried about Japanese citizens attacking the United States in their homeland. One reason why the Japanese-Americans were imprisoned was due the citizens choosing to be no-no boys. No-no boys are Japanese-Americans that choose to answer, in questionnaires, no for two particular questions. The two questions were, would you serve in the armed forces of the United States and would you swear to be…

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    Sometimes it is hard to explain my idea because I studied math using only Japanese in school. Although I tried to learn English math words before coming to the U.S, explaining complicated things in a foreign language is not easy. However, I was relieved that minor English mistakes are not problems because my mentor listens to me patiently. Once I come back to Japan, I would like to continue to study more so that I will be able to explain my idea using math words smoothly. On the contrary, I do…

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    appearance issues created prejudices exhibited by the Japanese and the “barbarians”. The Japanese people called Americans the “foreign devils—the barbarians” (4). Fear was created in the Japanese because of their unfamiliarity with the American customs. In the book, the Japanese felt the Americans’ customs made them barbarians. They killed animals for shoes (26). Americans sat on benches rather than the floor (31). They used a fork to eat rather than…

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    4.1 When I finally left home I realized how closed off I was to the rest of the world around me. With little diversity and culture represented in my Massachusetts home; it was a bit of a culture shock arriving in New York City. Here; different cultures are represented, various opinions are presented, and social norms are rejected. With this refreshing outlook on life, I believe it is necessary to get outside of your comfort zone and become aware of your surroundings. Back in my home town of…

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    East Asia adolescents view the government and society it became clear why some want the chance for the American dream. But, what is the 'American dream'? Simply put, it’s something from nothing. Regardless of where you are born into socially or economically you are not obliged to stay there. The American dream is possible through belief, hard work and through sacrifice not just because. When contrasted with other cultures, especially those of socialist or communist political and economic…

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    Christopher McDougall book Born to Run a Hidden Tribe, Super athletes, and the Greatest Race the World has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall has been an extremely influential role in how we view running and in a number of ways since it came out a few years ago. Born to run is an amazing book to read for all runners, from those wanting to improve their running time, reduce their chance of injury, and or simply to pick up some new running strategies. Christopher McDougall follows the Tarahumara…

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