Women, Property And Gender In The Iliad And The Odyssey

1410 Words 6 Pages
This research essay is to explore the invention of the female mind which involves women, property and gender in Homer’s Odyssey. In this essay we will go into detail about the similarities and differences of the many sources’ interpretation of the qualities that were necessary for a Greek woman to be considered a possible wife. The main sources involved in this research include “Primary sources” by M.B. McLatchey and “The Invention of the female mind” by Deborah Lyons and Raymond Westbrook”. All throughout Greek history you hear the great stories about the men of the Olympics. However, you hear very little about the women of that time. Women play a vital role in the run through of the odyssey. The women of the odyssey are unique in character, …show more content…
I honestly disagree with such a statement. Throughout the reading of the Iliad and the odyssey it was observed numerous times of the adulterous behavior of her husband. I believe it was only a matter of time before she “returned the favor”. However, I can agree that it was dog to the extent to which she took it where she felt it necessary to kill Agamemnon. Homer's reason for always involving Clytaemestra into his narrative so many times was likely to contrast her to Penelope. The women share many similarities, both are beautiful, adept, and extremely sly. However, while both women possessed great cleverness, each employed their talent in a different …show more content…
Men can roam freely and stay extended periods of time with any woman, but women are held to severe social codes of conduct, causing them to explore these extremes of either desirous and charitable motherhood or selfish adultery. The role of women in Homer's society and in modern day society closely resemble each other even though there is still much women have yet to accomplish. Homer saw a ray of light for women in humanity. One that would not be matched for years to come. Although professing that women were in no means equal to men, Homer still saw the means for the development of women in Greek

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