What Is The Impact Of The Women's Rights Movement

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While women make up over half of the current world population, historically women have been oppressed and forced into submissive roles. Only recently have women in the United States begun gaining equality. We have gained these rights and liberties because of the commitment past women, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretica Mott, and Betty Freidan, have made to social transformation. While the fundamental rights we have today-- such as the ability to obtain education, to vote, and have our voices heard—are often taken for granted, these rights are seventy-two years in the making.
Social transformation begins with an individual’s commitment and passion for a cause. The Women’s Rights Movement in the United States began when thousands of women came together to stand against slavery and spearhead the Abolition Movement. Through the Abolition Movement the women saw that they could work towards a common cause and make a difference. Because the movement against slavery was so successful they decided to once more come together and commit to obtaining rights for themselves. The two dominate frameworks that inform our understanding of the women’s movement in the United States
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The “second wave” of the women’s movement began addressing issues such as inequalities in the workplace, family, sexuality and reproductive freedom. Due to national discussion surrounding these issues ERA came into light once more and Congress passed it in 1972. However, the amendment failed to be ratified by enough states to become a law because women seemed to be divided against other women on the topic of gender equality (Freedman, 2003, 85). Despite the setback, the second wave accomplished many things. Today, woman I am able to wear, do and act as I wish because of the accomplishments women’s movement to thank for

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