Essay On World War I And Women's Suffrage

Improved Essays
World War I and Women’s Suffrage
During the twentieth century in The United States, women encountered and stood up to problems pertaining to their place in society. Ultimate freedom was the goal of many, as for the women, that was their proposed eventual goal. Many leaders rose up to the occasion, took action, and commanded the way towards personal moral success. Women demanded the right to vote, it was not an easy task to accomplish; however, with strength and potential, they overcame society’s views and not only reformed the government, but also changed the way women were identified as in general. There were many factors affecting the women’s movement, their fight was not limited to government refusal, they faced other circumstances as well.
World War I, which took place during the women’s suffrage movement, negatively and positively affected women’s development in civilization. The main negative aspect of war was obviously the deaths and troubles involved on the physical facet, but war also affected the way people prioritized problems. Women’s suffrage during the war was secondary to the on-hand problems originating from war; meaning, less attention was paid when women’s needs were expressed. As the war progressed, so did women, the women’s views were ignored even when they stood for days in front of the white
…show more content…
Their fight continued until their ideas were addressed and digested by the president. The war made people sensitive and thoughtful of women’s needs because of their involvement in War. The positive part of War originated from the peoples' new way of perceiving women in society. After women showed their enrollment during the war, “the House of Representatives initially passed a voting rights amendment on January tenth”. This amendment though was not passed until after the war, on “August 26, 1920” ("The Women’s Rights Movement,

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Women's Role In World War I

    • 2371 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Many people believed that World War 1 helped women but this is false. “ World War I led to several important advances for women. Women’s war work increased support for woman suffrage and contributed to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. In addition, during the war, the Department of Labor created the Women in Industry Service. After the war, the Women in Industry Service became the Women’s Bureau, headed by Mary van Kleeck.” During World War 1 women dominated the workforce and did a really good job with the tasks that they were assigned.…

    • 2371 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Women's Suffrage Essay

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Prior to the group being founded, women’s suffrage was considered a preposterous idea but thanks to determination and courage of the NAWSA this notion began to crumble. Under the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, the NAWSA launched state level political and social campaigns to gain women’s right to vote. This influenced the minds of some to allow women’s suffrage, but unfortunately not enough. During World War 1, in the absence of men women were left to support the nation; The NAWSA saw this as their chance to prove that women deserved the ability to vote. They seized this opportunity to persuade President Woodrow Wilson to ratify the 19th Amendment in 1920 after decades of fighting for their rights to vote.…

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    World War II took place from 1939-1945. It was a war in which women had to take on responsibilities that had previously been unavailable to them to compensate for the roles of men whilst they were away at war. The impact of World War II had repercussions for Australian society. The changing roles of women during World War II impacted upon both Australian women and men. Prior to World War II women had an insignificant role within society and previous wars.…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Olympe De Gouges Analysis

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages

    These two activists desired a countrywide change by amending the constitution instead of going for the state-by-state approach that the older women wanted to do. They started to get recognized through lobbying and protests against those who were not in favor of their cause. A politician’s wife has supported the two, and has been the key to their victory. After the suffragettes were put to jail and continued on protesting through hunger strikes, they were treated inhumanely. As the politician visited his wife, his eyes were opened to how women were treated so badly that it sparked the change that they needed with the help of the public, which made President Wilson to approved the amendment.…

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Throughout history before the 1920’s the institutions of culture have always regarded domestic violence as an “acceptable” measure for the husband in order to have control. When women tried to report the abusive behavior more often than not they were always blame for being the victim, basically saying it was their fault. During this time, women were heavily oppressed because the patriarchal system was fully enforced. It was not until the 1920’s where women started to fight for their rights and began to voice their values publicly during the women’s suffrage movement. After the 12th amendment was passed giving them the right to vote, it gave women more power in the government in order to fight for their rights.…

    • 880 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, women had no rights to file for divorce, own property, vote or get the same education as men. However, the nineteenth century brought changes to women issues, more women were starting to recognized the imbalanced of power between the sexes and saw winning the right to vote would bring them closer to equality. During the starting stages of the women’s suffrage movement, elite and middle class women were the driving force in the movement. However, as the movement continued more working class women started to support the campaign. The women’s suffrage movement first started attracting major attention from Parliament when the philosopher John Stuart Mill proposed a new amendment calling for the inclusion of women’s right to vote in 1866.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Suffrage Movement Analysis

    • 1690 Words
    • 7 Pages

    On the one hand, women were now viewed more deserving of the right to vote as they were better educated and proven their abilities in new white collar jobs and in local politics. On the other hand, the Suffrage movements put the issue of votes for women on the political map. The Suffragists gained support, including that of many MPs, through their dignified methods of protest. The Suffragettes gained a mass amount of support from the hunger strikes and gained a lot of sympathy and publicity for the cause. Also, as argued by historian Marwick’s Reward Theory, women received the vote in 1918 as a ‘thank-you’ for their work in WW1.…

    • 1690 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Ordinary Democratization: The Electoral Strategy That Won British Women the Vote,” by Dawn Langan Teele, outlines the path to women’s inclusion in voting. The reading conveys how the struggle, in which the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies formed a coalition with the Labour Party, eventually lead to women’s suffrage. By doing this, suffragists allowed women’s suffrage to be included in the 1918 Representation of the People Act. This path was not easy as it took years of hard work, determination, and the help of several political parties forming coalitions. The women and advocates for women’s suffrage were not deterred by the times and they fought for what they believed in.…

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The fight for women’s suffrage was an ongoing topic in the United States in the 1920’s. Women’s suffrage was the struggle for women to achieve the right to vote and hold office, which was a pressing matter for women of the time. But it was soon to be that women 's lives would be changed for the better in politics, work, education, and in the home. With advances in society, some women stood up and made a true example of women’s suffrage activists and future congresswomen. Jeannette Rankin was one of those women who decided to take a stand for what she believed.…

    • 1375 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This influenced the era of the 1920’s by showing that women had a voice and could stand up for equality. It impacted today’s society by starting a revolution of events that help to create equality between race, gender, and sexuality. Researching this topic helps show that women were not given the same rights as men in the past, and it describes the struggle women had to go through to earn those rights. History is meant to be learned from so that those…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays