The Womens Movement Of The 1960's

732 Words 3 Pages
The women’s movement of the 1960s was a movement that should have happened a long time ago. Women have been excluded from the government since the beginning of America even though they were just as important as men were to certain events, like abolition or prohibition. Women are central to society and should have been treated as such from the beginning. The movement took decades to be included in mainstream culture. When it finally was being talked about, the movement accomplished many goals women wanted. Most women at the time were stay-at-home mothers and wives. If a woman had a job, it was not a job with good pay or doing meaningful work. In the 1960s only a handful of women held political offices because most women, if they even had …show more content…
Just in the first chapter it talks about talented, educated women being trapped in a society that viewed marriage and motherhood as their primary goal. A result of the book was focusing attention to another gap in American rhetoric and American reality. Abby Kelley was one woman who felt that women were being treated like the African Americans. “ There seem to be many parallels that can be drawn between the treatment of Negroes and the treatment of women in our society as a whole.”. One of the first public campaigns of the radical feminists was the repeal of state laws that underscored women’s lack of self-determination by banning abortions or leaving it up to the physicians to decide whether a pregnancy could be terminated. But the women’s liberation went farther than sexuality. In the Sisterhood Is Powerful women wrote essays, manifestos and personal accounts from events in their lives. Each document touched different topics, ranging from violence against women to inequalities in the law, church, workplaces, and family …show more content…
For the longest time in our history, women were there to try and help different groups achieve their own freedoms and liberties. Women’s freedoms and liberties were always put aside to help others achieve their freedoms and liberties. When people earned their freedoms and liberties, they normally never went back and tried to help women gain their liberties. Women were tired of helping everyone else get freedoms when they did not have their own freedoms. They wanted to experience the America they helped shape. Women wanted to go out and get meaningful jobs, like working in factories to help out during World War II, and have the freedom to do what they wanted with their own

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