Was It Morally Justifiable for Truman to Use Two Nuclear Weapons Against Japan During Wwii?

1184 Words Aug 13th, 2012 5 Pages
WAS IT MORALLY JUSTIFIABLE FOR TRUMAN TO USE TWO NUCLEAR WEAPONS AGAINST JAPAN DURING WWII?

WWII is still the most horrific war in the history of human existence. With over 50 million dead in just 6 short years, every single chapter of the war has been eternally marked in world history. Two particular incidents that will last over the years would be the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Now being considered in hindsight, the nuclear attacks have become very controversial topics. In my personal opinion, I believe that the bombings were absolutely atrocious, but I also think that the bombings were needed for WWII to truly end.

Supporters of Truman’s decision believe that the bombings were a reasonable second option compared
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The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the only way the USA could get a guaranteed victory. The two cities were specifically chosen because they were practical military targets, having them destroyed would cripple Japanese both industrially and militarily; they would have to submit themselves. Bombardment was a very effective tactic during WWII. All the countries were using the method, it didn’t matter what type of bomb was dropped or by whom, everyone else was doing it too. The Japanese were not innocent themselves. They had begun the entire feud when they attacked Pearl Harbor without warning; and therefore bringing the isolationist Americans into the war. If they can attack suddenly, why can’t the Americans do the same? In addition, the Japanese had become unpopular with the general public. The list of innumerable atrocities that occurred in Nanking, China had spread. Many of their victims, as well as many people who heard of the stories were glad that the Japanese were atomic bombed. Finally, the bombings did indeed end the Second World War. Japan was definitely not going to give up. Some extremist military officers even attempted a rebellion against the emperor just in order to prevent surrender. With an estimated would-be grand total of 2 million casualties on both sides, many American fighters were convinced that the invasion of Japan would surely be a massacre, and were glad not to have to enter battle. Even so, Japan didn’t surrender until a week…

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