Socrates Acceptance Of Death In Apology And Crito By Plato

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Resistance as a civic virtue
Laws are not standard. They changes from state to state and obviously from country to country. Athenians judicial system condemned to death a man for having different beliefs than theirs and based in Apology and Crito by Plato in this essay I claim that Socrates’ acceptance of death under a failing judicial system is unvirtuous although he tries to picture it as a virtuous and civic act. His aberration for obeying the outcome of his trial becomes pointless because if he wants to be virtuous he must go against the system showing resistance. Socrates has to continue fighting back the unfair system that condemns him and convince others to join his cause
Should we follow the many or the one? He tells his friend Crito
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Will you associate with them, Socrates, and feel no shame when talking with them?” (Crito 53d) He expresses his inner feelings of thinking about fleeing but discarding the option because it will change the way people see him and how they interact with him. Socrates concepts of lawful and unlawful in the Crito seem to have come down to a second stage and the worry of the judgement is more noticeable as we read. The time in jail has given Socrates the chance of overthinking the possibilities and clearly, he has forgotten his words in trial. “I will certainly not stop philosophizing, and I will exhort you and explain this to whomever of you I happen to meet” (Apology 29c). During trial everyone heard how he was determined to continue speaking to “whomever” but never saw Socrates doing this because he never saw resistance as a way of showing …show more content…
He does not want to have his reputation stained or at least he is not going to see it happening. He has gone to politicians, poets, crafts maker and to wise men in general looking for their wisdom. He asks Athenians “do not make a disturbance, not even if I seem to you to be boasting somewhat” (Apology 20e). The worry of not wanting to be boasting implies the action of boasting being performed but also the desire of making it less noticeable by his listeners. Socrates does not want to be a politician but speaks like one when trying to convince the jury and by making sure his words do not give the wrong image. As one reads Apology and Crito over and over sometimes it becomes less about the right and wrong and more about how this could affect his

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