Thomas Paine Vs Seabury Analysis

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Thomas Paine was an emigrant from England who wrote a persuasive pamphlet in 1776, known as Common Sense. this was a political argument for American Independence, written to the colonists in hopes to get them on board with separation from Great Britain. Samuel Seabury was “a native of Connecticut” who wrote a series of pamphlets arguing against Independence, in 1775, to the colonists, to prove why they needed to stay joined with Great Britain. While some may think the two authors, Thomas Paine and Samuel Seabury, wrote similarly in their documents as they both agreed there was a good amount of problems between Great Britain and the colonies, they had many different opinions, including: opinions on separation, the outcome of separation and the …show more content…
Thomas Paine believed the colonies should have rebelled in order for them to become free. Paine wrote, “Reconciliation is now a fallacious dream.” He believed there was no possible way to make up the disagreements with Great Britain and the only way to solve anything was to separate so the colonies could be free. On the other hand, Samuel Seabury believed the colonies were intentionally causing problems with Great Britain just so they could rebel. He included in his argument against Independence, “When nothing seems to be consulted, but how to perplex, irritate, and affront, the British Ministry, Parliament, Nation and King?” Through this statement, he stated that the colonists were not trying to solve problems, but instead trying to annoy the King. Thomas Paine went on to say “But there is another and greater distinction for which no truly natural or religious reason can be assigned, and that is, the distinction of men into Kings and Subjects.” Through this opinion, he states that the government is to blame for putting labels on individuals such as rich v. poor. The colonists wanted to have equality among all and Paine stressed that under their own rule, that would have been

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