Thomas Paine's Argument Analysis

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Thomas Paine spread his thoughts and ideas on American independence in his pamphlet, “Common Sense,” which advocated the independence of the American colonies from Britain and had a great influence to those living in America surrounding the time of 1776. Paine grew up as a son of an English Quaker, and was an apprentice of his father’s in his earlier years, but by 1774 Paine was in America supporting the separation between the colonies and Britain as he became the political philosopher and writer as we know him by today. From reading “Common Sense,” it is clear that Paine believed in the colonists’ right to revolt, as he passionately states the reasoning and logic behind his ideas. Many of his arguments are well thought out and very effective …show more content…
Throughout his pamphlet Paine points out wrong doings of King George III that persuade Americans that the king does not care about the colonies well being, and that the English monarchy will only act in self interest. This rebuts any other arguments that attempt to show that the English will protect the colonies. When the argument of the advantages of monarchy come about, Paine tells that even though the simplicity of monarchy can be seen as an advantage the English constitution is far too complex. Again, he rebuts arguments to do with the king such as: the king is checked on by others. Paine shows that there is a fault in this argument by stating if the king must be monitored than he cannot be trusted, and that if he is being monitored by the people, than the people are better fit for the crown than the king is. Additionally, Paine suggest that the English constitution needs no mention of a king, since he believes a country without a king could be more prosperous and peaceful. He supports this with Holland’s period of no kings in which during that time there was more peace than any monarchy in Europe. Paine also mentions that a king is not supported by the rights of nature or scripture, and creates the question of what really justifies a monarchy, and even includes it as a sin of the Jewish. By denouncing the king, Paine expunges the basis of English government, which makes it easier for the American people to understand and agree with Paine’s opinion. By stating that decent monarchs have been rare, it allows the American people to lose their faith in the monarchy. Moreover, Paine looks at arguments from a logical perspective when he talks about the various difficulties that come from being ruled from thousands of miles away, and gaining no benefits. Paine suggests that America will make few friends, but gain the enemies of Britain if they do not separate. This could

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