How Did Thomas Paine Put America On The Road To Revolution

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The author Thomas Paine wrote a book that put America on the road to revolution. It was so memorable, the morals and topics discussed in the book, were included in the Constitution. Thomas Paine lived in New York from 1737 to 1809. At this time America was still a British colony and Paine wrote a book called Common Sense which discussed Representative Government and Republicanism, which was a show of open rebellion against the king. It one of the first books to openly suggest breaking free from Britain. And because it was written in a simpler style and was easily readable, it played a major role in persuading people to break from the British. The article states “being empowered by the people will have a truly legal authority” (Common Sense). …show more content…
Take the Federalist Papers, for example, they were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, urging the ratification of the Constitution after the Articles of Confederation were abolished and America was searching for a new government. They proposed new ideas and concepts not otherwise considered during this time period, one of those ideas was Checks and Balances in government. Federalist Paper no. 51 states, “It may be a reflection on human nature, that such devices (checks and balances) should be necessary to control the abuses of the government” (Federalist Paper no. 51). King George abused his power on the British throne. This aggravated his citizens and eventually lead to the colonies breaking free from Britain and forming America. The Federalist Papers were written shortly after the revolution, and many people like Alexander Hamilton wanted to make sure the government doesn’t become too strong. Checks and Balances make sure one branch doesn’t become too powerful. This concept of one branch controlling another is in the United States Constitution today. This is because of the influential people, like Alexander Hamilton who thought up the concept, also helped build the Constitution. It states, “All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States… The executive Power shall be vested in a President… The judicial Power of the United States shall be

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