The Shortcomings Of Multicultural Education

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Found in the workings of Richard Ruiz’s “Orientations of language planning, specific focus is placed on the shortcomings and strengths of language as a problem, right and resources in approaches to language planning” (Ruiz, 1984, p.15). Ruiz states that although there may be problems with a resource orientated approach to language, it could help to reshape attitudes about language and various language groups (1984). In essence, the placement of language as a resource can assist in the resolutions of the other two proposed orientations in viewing language as it can often directly impact the enhancement of language status among subordinate languages; serving as a more consistent way of viewing the role of non-English languages, easing the tensions …show more content…
As cited in Clarke and Medina (2000, p.65) Banks (1994, p. 86) contend that one of the most important aspects of becoming a multicultural teacher is the need to examine one’s own ideologies. The process of becoming multicultural starts with the personal questioning of beliefs, in which reading and writing narratives can assist teachers in creating valuable experiences for students to begin the process of becoming multicultural (Clarke and Medina, 2000, p. 65). Essentially, teachers can use the narratives of their own and students’ lives as a language resource whereby literature becomes a process of enacting critical awareness of the various narrative contexts shared, bringing thinking and theorizing together to determine a stance towards pedagogy, literacy and multiculturalism (Clarke and Medina, 2000, p.65). Furthermore, research conducted by Clarke and Medina (2000, p. 75) highlights the importance of reading and writing literacies in fostering multicultural understandings however limitations subside in the ability of teachers to eliminate stereotypes that may become present from the diversity of the students. Hence, seeing language as a resource can possess some limitations in providing useful learning opportunities if these issues are not met early on in the …show more content…
As stated in the NSW Quality Teaching framework (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008, p.31). , teachers should possess knowledge of cultural diversity and use it to implement and program student activities. May (2008, p. 415) examines the minority group of English language learners where barriers to school success can be experienced due to current discourses embedded in school curriculums and assessment tools. In order to maximise the full potential of English language learner’s teachers can benefit from creating a classroom environment with a goal of expanding learning through the exposure to the languages and cultures that children bring with them. Williams (2005, p.343) states that teachers often struggle on how to “reconcile conflicts in regards to discourse, that are ethical and constructive, respecting students community and home identities whilst teaching students literacies that will extend beyond the school and provide cultural capital.” Language is so forth seen as a resource for providing the connections between primary discourses for literacy learners whether it be through English as a second language or second language acquisition. A great example in catering for the diverse perspectives of English language learners can be seen through an approach that

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