Causes Of Primaries

Improved Essays
As demonstrated by the quote from Hirano, Snyder, Ansolabehere, and Hansen, the popular theory of activists controlling primaries suggests that activists not only force candidates to ideological extremes to win primary elections, but they also compel newly elected officeholders to remain more extreme than they normally would. This forces the party to risk losing the seat, because moderate candidates do better in general elections. Activists find primaries easier to take over than general elections because there are fewer voters to contend with, as most people do not bother voting in primaries. Primaries are not large enough to bring in the large sums of money needed to catch the public eye, and those who do vote in primary elections tend to be more involved in politics. People involved tend to have issues they care about or reasons to remain loyal to a specific party, otherwise they would not be involved. (Brady, Han, Pope, 2011)
This article will
…show more content…
The data gathered in this article can also suggest other major causes of polarization. If the political elite had the greatest sway over the candidates, there would be very little turnover because most candidates would have no reason to be ousted except when they were removing themselves from their party. In this case, a low level of turnover could be expected regularly. Similarly, if the electorate base had the most influence in who was elected, a moderate level of turnover could be expected regularly in primaries. In times of scandal, a very low level of turnover could be expected, as more incumbents would be defeated in re-election. The electorate would remove bad candidates and push ones more reflective of their viewpoints to the forefront of their parties over

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    They only interact with the citizens of the states they are trying to win over. Because they already know the votes of the other states. Then the argument of it helps with recounts and litigation. Lots of citizens can not vote, so that decrease the number of people voting and you only have to do a recount if the election is close. But if a candidate winning the majority of the votes there would be no reason to…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is because over the course of time, popular votes have been lost along the process of the electoral system. Presidents such as Rutherford B. Hayes did not receive a majority of the popular vote. Hayes won 47.9% whereas Tilden received 50.9%, but Hayes still became president through a 185 to 184 vote in the electoral college. (Longley and Neal, 32) Another reason I believe why the Electoral College should be eliminated is because there is a possibility to increase the overall voter turnout. There is a possibility that more citizens would use their right to vote if they know for certain that their vote matters and makes an impact.…

    • 1995 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Electoral College Abolish

    • 1518 Words
    • 6 Pages

    By getting rid of the Electoral College would bring the problems of those that with money could run and win even though they may not be the best candidate to run the country. It is a scary thought of some millionaire taking control of the country and just causing so many problems because they have only a single thing they want to do and no guidelines to stop them from causing those problems. It would be nice to have Independents represented better in the system it is a known system that keeps the crazies out. Most people know about who Reagan was and Carter was but not really Anderson. Anderson was Independent who got very little support compared to the others (Document B).…

    • 1518 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    As a result, these rules block legislation resulting in gridlock. Because of all these reasons, there will be disagreements, and resulting in gridlock. There are very few things that Paul Ryan can do to end gridlock but to start there needs to be comprehensive election reform. If the Congressional lines were redrawn, so their elections were more competitive between parties, there would be a higher likely hood of moderate candidates that are willing to work together. Also, if we allow the people to elect their own President, officials and vote on policy, there will be fewer arguments…

    • 1473 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Two disadvantages of one-party government are internal dissent and disenfranchisement of citizens. Just because a particular party may be the majority does not mean that all of its members are in complete harmony concerning their ideologies or policies they want to see implemented. Often times there are defectors within the camp due to the emergence of a particular candidate up for leadership or a particular policy of which there is disagreement. This internal dissent is evidenced by the recent presidential elections, although it did not affect the outcome, there was some disturbance within the Republican party when Donald Trump became the presidential nominee. The same thing happens within our state elections and many time leads to spilt ticket voting.…

    • 659 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    A candidate can win the popular vote but still not win the election, because that candidate has more votes from the Electoral College. Some believe that the larger states have too much power. When you have too many electoral votes, the voice of the individual decreases, therefore, leaving little influence in the presidential election. This amount of power makes the voting unequal. Another criticism is the Winner Takes All process.…

    • 1070 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Term Limits

    • 871 Words
    • 4 Pages

    However, they did not provide the expected changes that they had hoped to. I would argue that term limits have actually caused many negative effects; lowering the amount of competition in political races, lowering the amount of money available for parties to campaign and challenge incumbents and finally, causing challengers to wait for an easier race. While term limits have created more competition within open seat elections, it has caused challengers to wait for opportunity, which in my opinion offers the voting community less chance for change. Open seats are much easier to win for candidates versus closed seats with established incumbents. I believe that it has removed the complex nature of electoral competition.…

    • 871 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Population homogeneity and voter turnout appears to be weak. Voters, who voted in previous elections may repeat especially if the people, they voted for won. There could be problems with Blank’s concept because there are other factors pervious to turnout beside if they voted. Blais (2000) describes effect of compulsory voting on turnout is one of the most robust findings. There could be flaws in compulsory voting because people think about high turnout nothing will happen but compulsory voting turnout can decrease like any other country who does not have compulsory voting but just turnout decline will not be at an alarming rate.…

    • 1113 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since the quality of challengers facing incumbents is decreasing, the likelihood that an incumbent will lose an election also decreases. Incumbents are not only better equipped for participating in an election, but they are also being faced against weaker challengers. This facilitates an incumbent’s victory, increasing the incumbency advantage’s significance and making it more determinative and influential in…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Othello’s inability to see through Iago’s facade and intentions lead to his end. If Othello was able to properly read Iago, he wouldn’t have put so much trust in Iago’s words. In life things are commonly lost in translation and information is presented to draw the reader to one conclusion. The media frequently uses information in a bias way to help one party and often tries to lure people into one view. Even politicians commonly say things that sound good, but most time, it’s an act to help strengthen their campaign or have voters re-elect them for office.…

    • 2014 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays