The Importance Of Translation And Free Translation

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Translation existence results from the expansion and diversification of languages making individuals in need to collaborate and interact with each other and communicate. This implies that it has been practiced for thousands of years since the need for translation emerges when two (or more) different languages come into contact with one another. Its significance shows up from the earliest of the human development and civilization since it was – and still is – an important factor in establishing communication among people of different languages, societies, and cultures (Barbe,1990). A distinction clearly made between literal and free translation dates back to the Latin times. It is said that translation is a Roman invention as being "the first to articulate an attitude of reverence towards another nation felt to be historically older and culturally superior" (Jacobsen, 1958). Many translator support free translation while others prefer literal one. There are many reasons behind choosing the kind of translation. However, free translation can be reliable in conveying the idea and the content …show more content…
But translating the word by its primary meaning would make the translation unclear and out of meaning. Translators should be aware of the differences between the literal and free translation. In the literal translation, the grammatical structures of the SL have to be substituted by their nearest TL equivalents. In this method, context remains out of sight. Free translation on the other hand, is a type of translation in which more attention is paid to produceing a naturally reading TT than to preserveing the ST wording inact it depend on the reproduction and recreating the same meaning in the original language without much consideration of keeping the source text form (Tian,2014, and Barbe

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